Vulvar Itching

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How to cure pruritus vulvae or vulva itching?
    Vulvar itch really is uncomfortable, very painful, how to cure it?

    • ANSWER:
      You may have a simple yeast infection, or an STD causing the itching. Try a yeast cream and if it don't subside...go to your dr.

  2. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for vulvar pain and itching?
    Excuse me, I do not want to say my age, but i have been having vulvar itching for a week or 2 now. Every time i itch, it hurts really badly. I have tried leaving it alone, taking warm baths, it hurts all the time. It is also a little red. Please, is there any creme i can use that will take away this pain?

    • ANSWER:

  3. QUESTION:
    How can I get polyps to stop itching?
    Last year I developed acute vulvar and vaginal itching and was diagnosed with polyps. I had them mostly removed but small pieces remain. And from time to time I still have acute sharp itching where the polyps were/are. Does anyone know why they itch and how I can get them to stop? I've been tested for every possible infection, so I'm sure it's the polyps and not a yeast infection, etc.

    • ANSWER:
      As for what could be causing the itching it could be irritating part of the inside depending on their size (an example only).

      As to how to get rid of it the doctor can try something like silver nitrate to try and burn the remains off (another example only but I had something like this done earlier this year with one found on my cervix).

      I would recommend going back to your doctor to let them know that this itching is really bothering you and wanted to see what they say could be causing this.

  4. QUESTION:
    Is it ok to use feminine itch cream while pregnant?
    I'm pretty sure I don't have a yeast infection -- otherwise I'd just see my doc. I'm just itchy, probably from increased (tho not "yeasty") discharge.

    Is it ok to use external vulvar anti-itch cream? Or does this constitute something I should see my doc about first.

    • ANSWER:
      It should be alright as long as you don't use too much of it.

  5. QUESTION:
    My doctor diagnosed me with vulvar vestibulitis, what can I do to help stop the itching/burning?
    My dr gave me some stuff to use 2 times a day, and that helps with the burning, but do you guys know any options for how to calm the itching? Vulvar vestibulitis is a form of vulvadynia. The cause for it is unknown, and the treatment isnt guaranteed to work. What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      ugh, sorry about that. check this out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vulvodynia#Treatment_and_disease_management

  6. QUESTION:
    What can cause vulvar redness that is not yeast or an STD?
    I have had an area of redness just outside of the inner labia, next to my clitoris for a couple of months now. I thought it was yeast, and have been using an anti-fungal cream for a week with no improvement. There is no burning or itching, just mild irritation. I know for certain is not an STD, but cannot for the life of me figure out what is going on. Can anyone help?
    I do always wear cotton underwear and have not changed any soaps or detergents recently.

    • ANSWER:
      You might have an irritation due to laundry detergent you are using or the type of underwear you are wearing. Cotton undies are the best (but not the cutest) for your feminine area down there. You might want to switch to those for a while to see if that helps. :)

  7. QUESTION:
    Any women have vaginal/vulvar itching and burning every single month?
    Sometimes anal itching, too?
    Generally right before my period.
    This happens to me every single month and usually its not associated with any infections, and I have no STDs.
    Do you know what causes this or what treatments are available? How do you handle this torture every month??
    I don't use soap on my genitals or perfumes or scented toilet paper...yada yada yada, and like I said above, its rarely a yeast infection or any other infection.

    • ANSWER:
      Sometimes having your period can alter the PH levels in the vagina and cause itchiness. Some women have problems with yeast infections either before or after having their period because the PH balance has changed. You can have a mild yeast infection without having symptoms of a thick, white discharge.

      This has happened to me on several occasions. You can try taking a baking soda bath with a half cup of baking soda or try an antihistamine to help with the itching.

      You might want to talk to your gynecologist and find out what their opinion is.

  8. QUESTION:
    what can i do about yeast infection and vulvar damage for about 3months including various visits to the doctor?
    I really need some hope here. I have been suffering through this for about 3 months itching and burning and wetness from the yeast infection. it all started when I accidently got a cut by my outer vulva of my vagina and got infected. I thought I could of handled it on my own, used some antibiotics, but then researched that it can cause a yeast infection. I was using polysporin and felt and burning sensation that I couldn't handle. my cut was really infected and irritated. it came to the point I told my mom and went to the doctor. she told me to do sitz baths with Epsom salt and clotrimazole for the vulva and I for the suppositories for the yeast infection that wasn't yet full scale. I was getting nausea and dizziness from the clotrimazole that I went to the hospital and I was dumb enough to follow the doctors order not to use it and well I end up with a really bad yeast infection and cut. so then I used the treatment. I kept going back to the doctor for check up on the cut and well it was curing...but the yeast infection was still coming up she gave me pill but nothing...I never went back because she kept getting pissed..so then I bought another clotrimazole and nothing...I bought monistat 3 for a stronger effect I guess it was better but it came back...I used natural remedies such garlic suppositories...tea tree oil this week ... yougurt 2 days ago but nothing...my cut is gone but over time because of the yeast infections my vulva has become irritated and damaged that it burns and looks red..i went to my gynecologist he gave me a steroid cream its kinda working but its still irritated...and my yeast infection keeps coming back...and ughh!!! im so pissed that nothing is working I don't want to go thru this anymore :(

    • ANSWER:
      For this you need to be constant on the steroid cream that your gynecologist prescribed you, once it heals you have to continue taking it until you are one month fully recover, if you stop the treatment prior there is a chance to come back and even stronger. The gynecologist was by far the best decision. Keep area clean, and do not sit on the bathtub by doing so you are feeding the bacteria what they like. Good luck :)

  9. QUESTION:
    Should I see a gynecologist or a different kind of doctor?
    I saw my primary doctor regarding some feminine itching and lower abdominal pains. I was tested for a UTI- and there was too much bacteria to tell so she just treated me for one. Since then I have more dull pain in the lower abdominal and sharp pains in my left pelvic (especially when running). I tried scheduling a gyno appointment and the nurse seemed to think it was strange I wanted to see a gynecologist. Am I seeing the wrong doctor for this kind of pain?

    • ANSWER:
      For this type of problem it seems most fitting to visit a gynecologist. Here are a number of reasons why a woman may choose to visit her gynecologist:
      * Well-woman exams
      * Management of abnormal pap smears
      * Birth control
      * Abnormal heavy menstrual bleeding and irregular periods
      * Menopause
      * Ovarian cysts
      * Vulvar and vaginal infections and other problems
      * Breast pain and lumps
      * Infertility
      * Sexual dysfunction
      * Pelvic pain

  10. QUESTION:
    Why is the inside of my vagina swollen and itch?
    the inside of my vagina is swollen and it itches kind of. could this be a sign of being pregnant? because im 4 days late, but im on birth control. im 16. please help.
    the inside of my vagina is swollen and it itches kind of. could this be a sign of being pregnant? because im 4 days late, but im on birth control. im 16. please help. and i need to avoid the doctor, my parents would flip.
    oh and would a yeist infection make me be late?

    • ANSWER:
      sounds like a yeast infection , symptoms are * Abnormal vaginal discharge
      o Ranges from a slightly watery, white discharge to a thick, white, chunky discharge (like cottage cheese)
      * Vaginal and labial itching , burning
      * Redness of the vulvar skin
      * Inflammation of the vulvar skin
      * Pain with intercourse
      * Urination, painful

  11. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for a male to have an anal yeast infection?
    I was just wondering if its possible for me to have a anal yeast infection, because I have been experiencing severe chronic itching, burning and irritation. I was already checked for hemorrhoids and they are not the cause. I have been suffering with this problem for several months now and have taken many different antibiotics through out the past year could this be the cause? Also is there any over the counter medication to treat this for males?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. Go to Walmart and get generic Monistat cream (called Miconazole nitrate vulvar cream) and use it externally twice a day for about a week. If that doesn't fix it - go to the doc as it may indicate a tendency toward diabetes.

  12. QUESTION:
    do you have to have cottage cheese like discharge for it to be a yeast infection?
    i have itching down there, but no discharge. so can it be a yeast infection? or does it need to have discharge in order for it to be a yeast infection?

    • ANSWER:
      What are the symptoms of a yeast infection?
      First off, different vaginal infections tend to have very similar symptoms, so if a woman is experiencing one for the first time, or is unsure about a proper course of treatment, she should definitely see her doctor in order to get a proper diagnosis.

      With that said, yeast infections are caused by an overgrowth of an organism called Candida albicans. This critter is sometimes present in the vagina in smaller numbers without any symptoms, but occasionally a change in their environment gives them a chance to really multiply and grow out of control. These overgrowths are easily controlled with medications designed to kill the Candida organisms. Treatments come in a wide range of forms including pills and vaginal creams, which may need to be taken anywhere from one dose to a week-long course of medication. While some treatments are prescribed by a doctor, many are available over the counter.

      So, how can a woman tell that she has a yeast infection? Most women associate a thick discharge that looks like cottage cheese with the Candida bug, although only about 20% experience it. If it is present, the discharge may either have a starchy odor to it, or perhaps none at all, and its color can vary from white to a more yellowish tinge.

      Since not everyone gets the discharge, the easiest way for a woman to tell that she has a yeast infection is that she itches in and around her vagina. A lot. The itchiness may be accompanied by a burning sensation, and her vulvar area can be red and swollen. It may also burn or be generally painful for her to urinate, and sex may become painful as well. A good way to distinguish the burning on urination that is due to a yeast infection vs. a urinary tract infection is to pay close attention to exactly when the burning starts and stops. With yeast, the burning is due to acidic urine hitting the irritated skin of the vulva, so the burning starts when the urine reaches the outside. With urinary tract infection, the burning is felt as the urine passes down the tube on its way out.

      While these are the general symptoms of a yeast infection, every woman may experience one differently. She may identify an infection by the smell and consistency of the discharge, which can be unique to her. However, certain symptoms definitely do not go along with a simple yeast infection, and they may indicate that something more serious is going on. For example, if she is feverish or is experiencing pelvic pain, these are definitely indications that she ought to see her doctor in order to receive a proper diagnosis and medical care.

  13. QUESTION:
    What std could this be my boyfriend cheated on me?
    My boyfriend cheated on me and a week later my vagina starts itching what std can this be?

    • ANSWER:
      Although vaginal itching is the hallmark of yeast infections and other vaginal infections (including sexually transmitted diseases, STDs), itching in the vagina and vulvar areas has multiple causes. Vaginal itching can also arise due to chemical irritants that may be found in detergents or soaps, douches and vaginal creams, toilet paper, bath products, feminine hygiene products, and vaginal contraceptive products.

      Women in the menopausal transition may experience vaginal itching due to fluctuations in estrogen levels. As estrogen levels decline in the perimenopause, the vaginal wall becomes thinner and drier, and itching may result.

      Some studies have shown a link between psychological stress and vaginal yeast infections. This is likely due to the fact that stress is known to have a negative effect on the immune system and could possibly increase the likelihood of getting a yeast infection.

  14. QUESTION:
    Is it normal for your vajahjah to smell like cheese a week before your period?
    It's not itching...it's not burning...there's no abnormal discharge..but the smell is strong. I washed it out thoroughly this morning and it still smells like cheese!

    wtf is going on?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi - no, your vulva/vagina shouldn't smell of cheese. A cheesy smell from any area of the body usually indicates a fungal overgrowth.

      You shouldn't be 'washing out' your vagina, by the way. Good link below about care of the vulva:

      http://my.clevelandclinic.org/healthy_living/womens_health/hic_vulvar_care.aspx

      It's possible that your vaginal secretions (and your urine) is taking on the odour of strong-flavoured foods or drinks that you have been taking.

      Good luck.

  15. QUESTION:
    is it normal to have discomfort in the vulva area in early pregnancy?
    I have a little discomfort in my "area" and i've looked down there and don't see anything but it kind of itches (not terribly though) and it's making me crazy!!!!! I don't know what to do..Could I be pregnant? Or am i just over-reacting?

    • ANSWER:
      It is not common to have discomfort in the vulvar area in early pregnant.

      This itching that you are noticing could be an indication of something like a yeast infection (an example only). You could also be dealing with a condition called vulvodynia- pain of the vulva (another example only).

      The only way to know for sure is to see your doctor for further evaluation of the situation.

  16. QUESTION:
    Why does my vagina itch and burn?
    I had sex with my boyfriend for the very first time last Friday, my vagina started itching the following Tuesday, or Wednesday. I'm hoping it's a yeast infection but I do not have an unusual discharge, just server itching. I'm afraid to tell my mom because I know I'll have to go to the doctor and if it's something worse I'd rather just live with this.

    Is there anyway without seeing a doctor I can make sure this is only a yeast infection and nothing too serious?

    • ANSWER:
      its a yeast infection don't be afraid :)

      Since not everyone gets the discharge, the easiest way for a woman to tell that she has a yeast infection is that she itches in and around her vagina. A lot. The itchiness may be accompanied by a burning sensation, and her vulvar area can be red and swollen. It may also burn or be generally painful for her to urinate, and sex may become painful as well. A good way to distinguish the burning on urination that is due to a yeast infection vs. a urinary tract infection is to pay close attention to exactly when the burning starts and stops. With yeast, the burning is due to acidic urine hitting the irritated skin of the vulva, so the burning starts when the urine reaches the outside. With urinary tract infection, the burning is felt as the urine passes down the tube on its way out.
      eat a lot of yogurt. it helps next time use protection and save your self the trouble :)

  17. QUESTION:
    Who knows the causes of pruritus vulvae or vulva itching?
    I'm only 22 years old. But I always feel vulva itchy and always cant help scratching it. I want to know the reason. So later i will avoid appearing this kind of circumstance.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a number of causes of pruritus vulvae. These include:

      •A skin condition such as dermatitis, lichen simplex, psoriasis or lichen sclerosus.
      •Microorganisms such as candida (thrush), lactobacilli (cytolytic vaginosis), and less often, gardnerella, or trichomoniasis.
      •Irritant contact dermatitis due to scratching, friction, occlusive underwear, soap or inappropriate applications.
      •A skin cancer such as vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, extramammary Paget disease or rarely, invasive vulvar cancer

      Hope thats what ur looking for....

  18. QUESTION:
    Why does my vagina itch every day?Do i need to go to a clinic?Whats wrong with me?
    First couple weeks it would itch like crazy, everyday all day. Now its at night almost everyday or when ever i take a shower.
    it happened before i started shaving. and there is a clear discharge that comes out.

    • ANSWER:
      •Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      •Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      •Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      •Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      •Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      •Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:

      •Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      •Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      •Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      •Cleanse the area by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      •Eat yogurt with live cultures or take Lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      •Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      •Keep your blood sugar under good control if you have diabetes.
      •Lose weight if you are overweight.
      •Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.
      Call your doctor right away if:

      •You have increased thirst or appetite, unexplained weight loss, frequent urination, or fatigue -- these may be signs of diabetes.
      •You have pelvic or lower abdominal pain or fever.

  19. QUESTION:
    Is it true that when you have a yeast infection, menstruating can actually help cure the infection?
    I have a yeast infection, and today was supposed to be my doctors appointment, but i started my period so now i cant go to the doctor to get mediation, but my sister is saying that being on your period can actually help with the infection? Has anyone heard this? Is this true?

    • ANSWER:
      I've never heard it...But there are some over the counter medications you can get to help out. I like to use the monistat 1, cause you only do it one time instead of over the course of 7 days.

      And sometimes, to keep from using the creams, I use yogurt. Now before you say ewwww, it really works. You have to get regular, non-flavored, yogurt with active live cultures...It helps to get your normal bacteria levels back up... And it helps sooth the itch and discomfort you have. Dip a tampon in it and insert. That's all you have to do. And if you have external vulvar itching, rub some there, too.

  20. QUESTION:
    My labia and clitoris are very dry and itchy?
    Not a yeast infection, or an std, already covered those bases, just very uncomfortable and makes work hell. Are there any lotions or anything safe to use down there so I'm not either going mad from the itch, or rubbing myself raw trying to relieve it? Any ideas what it is? Please don't say its an std or crabs, it's the wrong area for crabs or lice, and its not possible for it to be an std.

    • ANSWER:
      Try Monistat vulvar cream

  21. QUESTION:
    How can I treat granulation tissue after a radical hysterectomy?
    I had a radical hysterectomy approximately 10 weeks ago. At my 6 weeks post-op checkup I complained of swelling in the pubic area and a light discharge. The Gyn./Onc said that I had some granulation tissue and cauterized the area.. I seemed to be fine, but within the last week the symptoms have returned and the swollen area is quite big. Any thought?

    • ANSWER:
      Several hysterectomy support sites have lists of what to expect after hysterectomy but they may represent a mixture of hysterectomy effects as well as symptoms from having the ovaries removed. The biggest complaint most women have is fatigue. This persists for 2 or 3 months post op. It seems to last longer when the return to activity is slower. In other words it pays to become more active sooner after surgery.

      Other immediate (within two weeks) post op symptoms may include:
      urinary tract frequency and urgency
      requires being checked for possible urinary tract infection although there may just be bladder spasms due to catheter irritation or small pelvic collections of blood near the bladder.
      incisional problems
      discharge or weeping of the incision in the first week or two
      itching or burning of the incision at 3-6 weeks
      pain that is localized to one side of the incision or another
      swelling underneath or to the side of the incision but different than the rest of the incision
      abdominal wall laxness, pot belly, bloated appearance
      gastrointestinal problems
      increased "gassiness" immediately after surgery (treatable with simethicone tablets or liquid)
      constipation treatable with stool softeners, flax seed
      loose stools (especially if antibiotics were given)
      vaginal problems
      bloody or odorous discharge for 1st 1-4 weeks
      odor without much discharge (may require topical vaginal antibiotic cream if persists beyond a week)
      vulvar burning or itching (usually just due to dryness and not a yeast infection)
      mood changes
      reversion to moods previously ignored due to hecticness of every day life
      fatigue
      decreased libido
      increased feelings of stress and anxiety
      increased depressive symptoms
      (Note - any 6 week period of significantly altered daily activity like postoperative recovery can lead to a change in mood for better or worse. It is not very predictable.)
      pain
      pain and swelling or redness at the site of the intravenous needles
      pelvic cramps and catches somewhat sporadic in occurrence or related to increased physical activity
      general problems
      generalized allergic rash or itching to medications such as antibiotics or pain medicines

      Remember that most women will say it takes up to 6 months after surgery before they do not think on a daily basis about having had surgery.

  22. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a male yeast infection?
    What goes on when the male gets it, and how do they treat it?

    • ANSWER:
      Yeast infection symptoms include severe burning, itching, irritation, and a whitish-gray discharge. The most common is perhaps the vaginal yeast infection, which can additionally be accompanied by the redness, inflammation of the vulvar skin, painful urination and sexual intercourse, and a discharge often smelling like bread or beer, which can range from thick and clumpy to clear and thin.

      Here is a guide on male yeast infection and symptoms of yeast infection.

      I hope it will help you

  23. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a yeast infection?
    I think I have a yeast infection, my vagina is itchy and I have a different discharge. I'm late for my period so could a yeast infection be making me last ?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include:

      1. Burning,

      2. Soreness,

      3. Pain during intercourse and/or urination, and

      Vaginal discharge. (Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese.)

  24. QUESTION:
    What could fluid or hemorrhages in the pelvic area mean?
    my mom has been having a rough time.the doctors diagnosed her with vulvadynia and vulvitis, and she has severe nerve pain in her pudendal nerve. this has been going on for about 8 months? and she got an MRI done the other day and the doctor just said he found there could be fluid or hemorrages in the pelvic area. he sent it to the gynecologist for them to look at. what could this mean? tell me EVERYTHING please.im really worried.

    • ANSWER:
      This is a tough question and it sounds like you're really worried. Hopefully you and your mother can get some better answers from the gynecologist. Meanwhile here is some basic information:

      Vulvadynia is often characterized by burning discomfort, itching, throbbing, or tenderness of the vulva - sometimes in the labia, sometimes around the opening of the vagina, sometimes affecting the vestibular glands - which may be experienced either as diffused irritation or as specific painful spots. The group of symptoms is classified by many names, partly because of the ways in which it may present or respond to treatment: vulvar pain syndrome, focal vulvitis, vestibular adenitis, vulvodynia, vulvar vestibulitis, or simply vestibulitis.

      http://www.pudendal.info/

      Vulvitis

      Vulvitis is simply an inflammation of the vulva, the soft folds of skin outside the vagina. This is not a condition but rather a symptom that results from a host of diseases, infections, injuries, allergies, and other irritants. Diagnosing and treating this condition can be frustrating because it is often difficult to determine the specific cause of the irritation.

      http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/uvahealth/peds_growth/vvts.cfm

      The pudendal nerve is a sensory, autonomic, and motor nerve that carries signals to and from the genitals, anal area, and urethra. There are slight differences in the nerve branches for each person but typically there are three branches of the nerve on each side of the body; a rectal branch, a perineal branch and a clitoral/penile branch. There is ongoing research into the exact areas innervated by the pudendal nerve. PN occurs when the nerve or one of its branches becomes damaged, inflamed, or entrapped.

      http://www.stanford.edu/group/whpu/qa/03,18,99.html

      As far as the fluid or hemorrhages- I can't answer that question and really recommend that you ask a medical professional. I hope that you and your mom get the information and help that you need.

  25. QUESTION:
    my friends vagina has gone a little bit purple and is starting to smell?
    My best friend Becky wanted me to post this;
    Her vagina has gone slightly purple and is starting to smell.
    Any ideas what this could be?

    • ANSWER:
      A purple color could be caused by a yeast infection or chronic irritation of the vulva, known as Lichen Simplex. A yeast infection frequently changes the vulva from a pale pink to a red, although not necessarily purple.

      Lichen Simplex is a dermatologic condition when the vulvar skin is sensitive and irritated over a period of weeks or months. Along with a change to dusky red or purple-looking vulva, signs and symptoms of Lichen Simplex include:

      . mild to severe itching and/or burning of the vulva
      . swelling and/or thickened areas of skin
      . skin tears caused by scratching
      . raw and/or damp feeling

      Irritants that sometimes lead to Lichen Simplex include detergents, soaps, lotions, deodorant tampons/pads, douches, colored and perfumed toilet paper, and certain contraceptives and synthetic fabrics. If a woman's body is sensitive to these products, chronic irritation could develop. In general, bumps, redness, rashes, itching, lumps, and lesions on the vulva, accompanied by reddish or purplish skin, are usually the result of skin irritation, infection, or are caused by environmental factors. In rare cases, a color change of the vulva could indicate a more serious disease.

  26. QUESTION:
    What can you use for only vagina itching?
    Has no odor , no discharge .
    on outside of vagina area.

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal itching
      Overview
      Treatment
      Alternative Names:
      Pruritus vulvae; Itching - vaginal area; Vulvar itching
      Home Care:
      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:

      Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.
      Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      Eat yogurt with live cultures or take lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      Cleanse by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      Lose weight if you are over weight.
      Keep your blood sugars under good control if you have diabetes.
      It is also helpful to:

      Avoid scratching, which will only aggravate the problem.
      Avoid overexertion, heat, and excessive sweating.
      Delay sexual activity until your symptoms get better or at least use a lubricant during intercourse.
      Use condoms to avoid catching or spreading sexually transmitted diseases.
      If you know that you have a yeast infection because your symptoms are exactly the same as those in the past, try over-the-counter creams or vaginal suppositories.

      Yeast infections are not considered sexually transmitted. However, sometimes men also develop itching and redness following sexual contact. If this is the case or you get recurrent infections for unclear reasons, both you and your partner may require treatment. Talk to your doctor.

      For itching related to menopause, your doctor may consider estrogen cream or tablets to insert vaginally.

      Teach children to resist and report any attempted sexual contact by another person. Don't try to remove any foreign object from a child's vagina. Take the child to a doctor right away for removal.

      Call your health care provider if:
      Call your doctor right away if:

      You have pelvic or lower abdominal pain or fever.
      You have increased thirst or appetite, unexplained weight loss, frequent urination, or fatigue -- these may be signs of diabetes.
      Call your doctor if:

      Your symptoms worsen, last longer than 1 week, or recur despite self-care.
      You have unusual vaginal bleeding , swelling, or discharge .
      Your partner also has symptoms or you think you may have a sexually transmitted disease.
      You have burning with urination or other urinary symptoms -- you may have a urinary tract infection.
      You have blisters or ulcers on your vagina or vulva.
      What to expect at your health care provider's office:
      Your doctor will exam you, including a pelvic exam, and ask questions to help diagnose the cause of your vaginal itching. These questions may include:

      When did the itching begin?
      Have you had it before?
      Is the itching severe?
      Does it limit your activities?
      Where exactly is the itching? On the inside of the vagina or on the outside (vulva) as well?
      How often do you bathe or shower?
      Do you use scented soap, scented or colored toilet paper, or bubble bath?
      Do you frequently swim or participate in water sports? Do you change your clothes soon after such activities?
      Do you wear cotton panties or synthetic ones?
      Do you wear tight pants or tight pantyhose?
      Do you use douches or feminine hygiene spray?
      Are you sexually active? Do you use contraception? What type?
      Does anything make you feel better?
      Does anything make you feel worse?
      Have you tried any over-the-counter creams? Which ones?
      Do you have any other symptoms like vaginal bleeding, swelling, rash, or pain on urination ?
      Do you have a personal or family history of diabetes?
      What medications do you take?
      What is your menstrual history? Including questions like: How old were you when your periods began? How often do your periods usually come? How long do they generally last?
      Do you have any allergies?

      Diagnostic tests that may be performed include:

      Culture and microscopic exam of vaginal discharge
      Pap smear
      Urine and blood studies (including hormone levels)
      Skin biopsies of the vulvar area
      Antifungal drugs may be prescribed for yeast infections. When indicated, steroid creams or lotions may be prescribed to reduce inflammation. Ointments containing hormones may be ordered, and benzodiazepines or antihistamines may be prescribed for nighttime relief.

      Antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial vaginal infections, including sexually transmitted diseases.

      References:
      Clark LR, Atendido M. Group B streptococcal vaginitis in postpubertal adolescent girls. J Adolesc Health . 2005; 36(5): 437-440.

      Edwards L. The diagnosis and treatment of infectious vaginitis. Dermatol Ther . 2004; 17(1): 102-110.

      Reid G, Bruce AW. Urogenital infections in women: can probiotics help? Postgrad Med J . 2003; 79(934): 428-432.z

  27. QUESTION:
    Could recurrent yeast infections be a sign of prediabetes?
    I am at my wits end with my yeast infections. I wipe front to back, take probiotics, everything I'm supposed to do. But I keep getting infections. My blood sugar is normal, but I am definitely overweight. Might I still have prediabetes even if my blood sugar number is technically ok?

    • ANSWER:
      Let's take a look at another little pest for you. You may not have a yeast infection..It could very well be a Bacterial infectionBacterial vaginosis refers to an overgrowth of certain types of bacteria that are normally present in the vagina and is not a sexually-transmitted infection (STD). The condition used to be referred to as Gardnerella vaginitis; because Gardnerella is a type of bacteria that sometimes causes the infection. While symptoms are not present in about half of women with bacterial vaginosis, those who do experience symptoms will have vaginal discharge, usually with an unpleasant odor. The discharge is usually gray to white in color but can be of any color.

      Another common type of vaginitis results from vaginal yeast infections. Candida albicans is the type of fungus most commonly responsible for vaginitis. Yeast is believed to be present in the vagina of 20%-50% of healthy women. Vaginal yeast infections occur when new yeast is introduced into the vaginal area or when there is an overgrowth of the yeast already present in the vagina, for example, when the normal protective bacteria are destroyed by antibiotics taken to treat another infection. Yeast can also overgrow and cause infections in women with suppressed immune function.

      Like bacterial vaginosis, yeast infection may result in a vaginal discharge. In this case, if discharge is present, it is usually thick and whitish, with a consistency similar to that of cottage cheese. But the most common symptom is itching in the vaginal or vulvar area. A burning sensation and pain during intercourse or urination are also characteristic symptoms of a yeast vaginitis. Unlike the discharge of bacterial vaginosis, the discharge of a yeast infection is typically odorless.

      If you have any of the symptoms of bacterial vaginosis or yeast vaginitis, it is important to contact your health care practitioner. The symptoms of both conditions are nonspecific and can also occur in more serious infections and conditions, so a correct diagnosis is important. By examination of the vaginal discharge under a microscope, the diagnosis can usually be established if it is not apparent from the symptoms alone. Both conditions can be effectively treated with antibiotics, and an accurate diagnosis ensures the choice of appropriate antibiotic treatment.

      Take care

      BEn Trolled

  28. QUESTION:
    How do I kow if I have a yeast infection?
    What are the symptoms of having a yeast infection? I am not sexually active, so i dont think i have an STD. My vagina is very itchy and red. How do I know if I have one and how do I stop it? Its so itchy I cant stop scratching. And its looks a little swollen, and I have a yellow discharge.

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal yeast infection (yeast vaginitis) and vulvitis cause symptoms that are nonspecific, which means that aside from the yeast infection, other conditions can cause the identical symptoms. The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include:

      burning,
      soreness,
      pain during intercourse and/or urination, and
      vaginal discharge. Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese.

      Vulvitis can also cause local pain in addition ot the above symptoms. Pain in the vulvar area is referred to as vulvodynia.

      In up to 5% of women, yeast vulvovaginitis may cause a recurrent problem. A recurrent yeast infection occurs when a woman has four or more infections in one year that are not related to antibiotic use. Recurrent yeast infections may be related to an underlying medical condition and may require more aggressive treatment.

      How are vaginal yeast infections and vulvitis diagnosed?
      Vaginal yeast infection (yeast vaginitis) is suggested when a cheesy white discharge is noted over the walls of the vagina, but the symptoms of vaginal yeast infection are nonspecific and may be a result of other conditions. To firmly establish the diagnosis and to rule out any other causes of the symptoms, your doctor may take a specimen scraped from the affected area for microscopic analysis or for culture in the laboratory. Identification of yeast under a microscope, when possible, is the least expensive and most rapid and accurate way to establish the diagnosis.

  29. QUESTION:
    what are symptoms of yeast infections?
    for the past few days i have been having bad vaginal itching, and some discharge. i know for a FACT its not a STD.

    • ANSWER:
      Hey jason,

      The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include:

      1. Burning,

      2. Soreness,

      3. Pain during intercourse and/or urination, and

      Vaginal discharge. (Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese.)

  30. QUESTION:
    whats the difference between a yeast infection and gonnorhea?
    and what are the symptoms of each
    and how could i find out if i had either of these??

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of gonorrhea include pain and burning during urination, as well as yellowish and sometimes bloody discharge from the vagina. Many men will not exhibit any symptoms, although in some cases, a yellowish or bloody discharge will be excreted from the penis. Gonorrhea may be cured but reinfection may occur, especially if both partners are not treated.

      Vaginal yeast infection (yeast vaginitis) and vulvitis cause symptoms that are nonspecific, which means that aside from the yeast infection, other conditions can cause the identical symptoms. The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include:

      burning,
      soreness,
      pain during intercourse and/or urination, and
      vaginal discharge. Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese.

      Vulvitis can also cause local pain in addition ot the above symptoms. Pain in the vulvar area is referred to as vulvodynia.

      In up to 5% of women, yeast vulvovaginitis may cause a recurrent problem. A recurrent yeast infection occurs when a woman has four or more infections in one year that are not related to antibiotic use. Recurrent yeast infections may be related to an underlying medical condition and may require more aggressive treatment.

  31. QUESTION:
    How do i know if i have a yeast infection?
    I have a white discharge. But i can't tell because my boyfriend shoots off in me & when i get off of him i notice some white discharge...
    i also had a rash on the outside of my labia majora and it was burning and itchy to the point where if i scratched it, it would burn then i used some monistat itch cream and that's when after a few hours it went away... So is it possible it could be a yeast infection

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include: 1. Burning, 2. Soreness, 3. Pain during intercourse and/or urination, and 4. Vaginal discharge. (Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese).

  32. QUESTION:
    Are vaginal spots or freckle like spots normal?
    I discussed them with my gyno, but she didn't seem concerned. She said they look normal, but not sure she really paid much attention to them. Everything I read online says vulvar cancer or vaginal melanoma. I have about 4 or five, mostly smaller than a pencil eraser, not raised, does not itch or hurt, and a medium brown color. should I get a second opinion? I also have freckles on my face.

    • ANSWER:
      No, its not normal

  33. QUESTION:
    The bottom and inner part of my vagina is itchy and a little red. And my discharge appears to be white?
    And clear, I don't have any lesions or anything. Is this a yeast infection?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include: 1. Burning, 2. Soreness, 3. Pain during intercourse and/or urination, and 4. Vaginal discharge. (Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese).

      Since your discharge is clear and white it's possible that you might have a bacterial infection instead of yeast. I would recommend you seek medical attention to know exactly what is causing your symptoms and ge tthe proper treatment required to expunge your infection.

  34. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have a Yeast Infection? I am unsure about the symptoms and how do I get it diagnosed easily?
    For the past week I have had very shy symptoms of SOMETHING going on in and around my Vagina.
    What are ALL the symptoms of a Yeast Infection?
    How do I get it confirmed that I have one?
    Do I have to go to the gyno??

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis cause symptoms that are nonspecific, which means that aside from the yeast infection, other conditions can cause the identical symptoms. The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include:

      burning,

      soreness,

      pain during intercourse and/or urination, and

      vaginal discharge. (Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese.)

  35. QUESTION:
    woke up with vulvar itching?
    I woke up w/vulvar itching and everything really down there seemed irritated, After I washed up it seemed to stop itching but it is very sensitive, I was thinking maybe it was from the heat (my itchiness b/c our a/c went out and it's so hot in the bedroom) but now it's all sensitive down there, I don't have any abnormal discharge..I didn't have intercourse last night... what do u guys think??

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like you have a yeast infection and there is over the counter meds for that - I recommend not getting the one day treatment as it doesn't work as well and it is more expensive - I would buy the 3 day treatment as the 7 day can kinda be a pain in the butt.

  36. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have BV and not know it?
    My sister went to the doctor and they took her blood. They said she had an infection somewhere in her body that they couldnt find. The only place they didnt check was her lady parts. Is it possible for her to have BV without knowing?
    As far as i know BV is an infection and they can tell that by your white blood count.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it is possible to have BV and not know it. Unlike other causes of vaginitis, BV does not cause vaginal itching, burning, or inflammation, and only causes vulvar irritation in 20% of cases. One would hope the owner of the vagina would be aware of vaginal discharge in BV, as well as a "fishy" odor; but some women are extremely ignorant, claiming to not know that they missed their last 9 periods, put on some chub, and are pregnant... until they are "surprised" by going into labor; so, I wouldn't be surprised some women do not notice the signs of BV.

      BV stands for bacterial vaginosis, which is not so much an infection as an overgrowth of normal vaginal flora, specifically Gardnerella. BV is not diagnosed by any blood tests; rather, it is diagnosed by a wet prep showing what are called "clue cells," vaginal pH, quality of vaginal discharge, and "whiff" test.

  37. QUESTION:
    can anyone tell me some tips or some cream to control vaginal itching?
    i tried using vagisel cream but not working . am not able to sleep at night because of this but there is no itching in day time pls help

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal itching
      Common causes of vaginal itching include:

      Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      Pinworms (a parasitic infection mainly affecting children)
      Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      Home Care Return to top

      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:

      Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.
      Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      Eat yogurt with live cultures or take lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      Cleanse by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      Lose weight if you are over weight.
      Keep your blood sugars under good control if you have diabetes.
      It is also helpful to:

      Avoid scratching, which will only aggravate the problem.
      Avoid overexertion, heat, and excessive sweating.
      Delay sexual activity until your symptoms get better or at least use a lubricant during intercourse.
      Use condoms to avoid catching or spreading sexually transmitted diseases.
      If you know that you have a yeast infection because your symptoms are exactly the same as those in the past, try over-the-counter creams or vaginal suppositories
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003159.htm#Definition

      WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      * Itching persists more than three days, doesn't respond to home remedies or is getting progressively worse.

      What Your Symptom Is Telling You

      Unless you spend your summers at a nudist camp, your private parts are often covered in three or four layers of material—perhaps a pantiliner, panties, a pair of snug-fitting pantyhose and your coolest Calvin Kleins.

      So what is that warm, moist part of you doing under all those layers?

      It's itching! And it's driving you nuts.

      Vaginal itching can come from something as simple as trapping bacteria for too long under too many layers of too-tight clothes. All that warmth and moisture provide perfect conditions for incubating infections.

      In fact, itching can be the unwelcome calling card of a wide variety of infections, ranging from bacterial vaginitis to yeast (also called Candida albicans or monilia) and trichomoniasis.

      The itching can also signal an allergy to a chemical in soap, deodorant or dye, or may simply be a sign of thinning vaginal tissues in women approaching menopause.

      Symptom Relief

      Let's take a soothing look at how to banish that infernal itching.

      Sitz in some salt. Several forms of vaginitis will often respond to a simple home remedy—the saline sitz bath. Here's the recipe from Gideon Panter, M.D., a gynecologist in New York City.

      Dissolve a half-cup table salt in a shallow tub of warm water. In the tub, insert your finger into your vagina to let the warm salt water in, then remove your finger and relax for 10 to 15 minutes. Two or three consecutive nights of sitz baths should ease the itch, if yours is home treatable, Dr. Panter says.

      Abstain for the duration. Don't have sexual intercourse until your itching has cleared up, Dr. Panter says. If the organism that set up its itchy housekeeping in your vagina was transmitted by your partner, there's no sense in re-exposing yourself to trouble. Take a few days to show love in other ways, he suggests.

      Consider the condom. Condoms provide wonderful protection against both unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease. If condom use always seems to be followed by a bout of vaginal itching, however, it's possible that an allergy to the condom's latex rubber, powder coating or lubricant could be the problem.

      Try this simple home patch test from Bruce Katz, M.D., a dermatologist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. Tape an inner-side piece cut from a fresh condom to one arm, and an outer-side piece to the other arm. Leave both pieces in place for 48 hours, and keep the areas dry. If both arms react, you're allergic to the rubber. If only the arm with the inside of the condom taped to it gets itchy or rashy, you're allergic to the powder. If only the arm with the outside piece reacts, you're allergic to the lubricant.

      Does this mean you should avoid using condoms? Absolutely not, says Dr. Katz. Their role in reducing infection risk is too critical. Instead, have your partner use two—lambskin over latex if you are allergic to rubber, or reverse the order if the powder is the problem. Why not just switch to lambskin? Lambskin on its own can't protect against some organisms, including the virus that causes AIDS. Dr. Katz says a nonlatex condom should be on the market shortly, which will solve the problem entirely.

      Ask your doctor. You'll need your doctor's help to determine which type of infection is causing your itching. If you've been diagnosed with yeast infections in the past, and are very familiar with the specific symptoms, call your doctor for a prescription, recommends R. Don Gambrell, Jr., M.D., clinical professor of endocrinology and obstetrics and gynecology at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital and Clinics in Augusta. Your doctor will prescribe antifungal medications such as Vagistat, Nystatin or Monistat.

      Trichomoniasis is treated with the prescription antibiotic Flagyl. Bacterial infections call for antibacterial agents—either sulfa drugs or, if you're allergic to sulfa, with Betadine antiseptic, an over-the-counter product, says Dr. Gambrell.

      "And be sure to have your doctor test you for the human papilloma virus (HPV)," recommends Jessica L. Thomasson, M.D., a gynecologist at Columbia Medical Center in Milwaukee. This virus, which causes genital warts, is an important and frequently overlooked cause of vaginal itching, she says.

      Get help for menopause symptoms. If you're approaching menopause, ask your doctor about treatments for itching caused by changes that are taking place in the vagina. Hormone replacement therapy is an option, but you should also ask about prescription hormonal creams for the vagina.

      Bag the douche and powder. Douching not only won't help to relieve itching or vaginitis, it may be dangerous, says David Eschenbach, M.D., professor and chief of the Division of Gynecology at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. Douching may drive infectious material up through the cervix and cause pelvic inflammatory disease, he says.

      The use of talcum powder or cornstarch is questionable, too, Dr. Eschenbach says. Over time, the tiny particles may collect near the ovaries and increase ovarian cancer risk.

      Defeating the Yeast Beast and more....
      http://www.mothernature.com/Library/bookshelf/Books/16/254.cfm
      http://health.allrefer.com/health/vaginal-itching-info.html
      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/sym/vaginal_itching.htm
      http://www.vagisil.com/understanding_itch.shtml

      Now you have a lot to read and I am sure you'll find the right way to deal with your problem.

  38. QUESTION:
    why does my vagina ich im still a virgin?
    im a virgin and i've never done anything sexual with a guy but for some reason my vagina started to ich real bad and i dont know why im 14 yrs old does anyone know what this could mean.????
    yeah i've heard of yeast infections but i really dont know what that is...nd no i havent shaved so i dont think thats it.

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible to have a yeast (Thrush) infection - even babies get them, it has nothing to do with sex. It is the most common cause of severe itching in the vulvar/vaginal area.

      Yeast Infection Overview

      Candidiasis is an infection caused by a group of microscopic fungi or yeast. There are more than 20 species of Candida, the most common being Candida albicans. These fungi live on all surfaces of our bodies. Under certain conditions, they can become so numerous they cause infections, particularly in warm and moist areas. Examples of such infections are vaginal yeast infections, thrush, skin and diaper rash, and nailbed infections.

      * Candidal infections commonly occur in warm moist body areas, such as underarms. Usually your skin effectively blocks yeast, but any breakdown or cuts in the skin may allow this organism to penetrate.

      * Typical affected areas in babies include the mouth and diaper areas.

      http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/candidiasis-yeast-infection

      What is a Yeast Infection?

      A vaginal yeast infection is usually caused by a fungus called Candida albicans which is normally found in small amounts in the vagina.

      It's estimated that three out of four women will have a yeast infection in their lifetime. Factors that contribute to vaginal yeast infection include pregnancy, diabetes, and the use oral contraceptives, steroids, and antibiotics. Yeast infection is also more common after menopause due to declining estrogen levels, which thin the vaginal walls.

      Symptoms of Yeast Infection

      * Itching and burning around the vagina
      * White vaginal discharge that may look like cottage cheese
      * Pain during sexual intercourse

      Yeast Infection Prevention
      Once you've had a yeast infection, you'll probably never want it again. Unfortunately, yeast infections do tend to recur. To help lower your chances of experiencing another yeast infection, or to prevent getting one in the first place, here are some things you can do:

      * Consider taking a daily supplement designed to help prevent the recurrence of a yeast infection
      * Keep you vaginal area clean, being sure to wash the area when you shower
      * After a shower or bath, make sure your vaginal area is completely dry before getting dressed
      * Wear cotton underpants and pantyhose with a cotton crotch
      * After using the toilet, always wipe from front to back
      * Avoid sharing towels and washcloths
      * Wash your under garments in hot water and skip the fabric softener in the dryer
      * Avoid clothing that is tight in the crotch
      * Always change out of your exercise clothes or swimsuit immediately after working out or swimming
      * Change your sanitary pads or tampons frequently and avoid using ones that are scented
      * Avoid using heavily scented soaps, perfumes and talcum powder
      * Avoid douching
      * Use antibiotics only when necessary
      * Eat a diet high in vegetables, protein and grains as well as consuming yogurt that has live acidophilus bacteria; avoid processed foods, sugars and alcohol
      * Always use a water soluble lubricating gel during sex
      * Consider using a condom if you are having sex and have a yeast infection
      * Make sure your vagina is well lubricated during sex; avoid sex if it feels painful
      * If you are experiencing chronic yeast infections and are using hormonal contraceptives, like the birth control pill, consider changing your birth control method

      http://www.epigee.org/guide/yeast.html
      * Burning with urination

      http://altmedicine.about.com/od/healthconditionsqtoz/a/yeast_infection.htm

  39. QUESTION:
    why ther is pain in vagina and clitoris while urinating?
    i have severe pain in the. vaginal and clitoris area during urinating.during since i am not able to reach my climax my boy friend insert his finger inside the vagina.will ther be any cut due to sex . whether the pain is due to that?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      When a woman feels pain while having sexual intercourse, it is called dyspareunia. Painful sex is fairly common. Nearly two out of three women have it at some time during their lives. The pain can range from very mild to severe.

      Painful sex can have both physical and emotional causes. To understand why the pain occurs, you should know what happens to your body during sex.

      A woman's body follows a regular pattern when she has sex. There are four stages:

      Desire — The feeling that you want to have sex.
      Arousal — Physical changes take place. Your vagina and vulva get moist and the muscles of the opening of the vagina relax. The clitoris swells and enlarges. The uterus lifts up, and the vagina gets deeper and wider.
      Orgasm — The peak of the response. The muscles of the vagina and uterus contract and create a strong feeling of pleasure. The clitoris can feel orgasm, too.
      Resolution — The vagina, clitoris and uterus return to their normal state.

      Types of Pain and solutions for that

      During sex a woman may feel pain in the vulva, at the opening of the vagina, within the vagina, or deep inside. Vulvar pain is pain felt on the surface (outside) of the vagina. Vaginal pain is felt within the vagina. Deep pain can occur in the lower back, pelvic region, uterus and bladder.
      Vulvar Pain
      Pain can occur when some part of the vulva is touched. The vulva may be tender or irritated from using soaps or over-the-counter vaginal sprays or douches. Other causes include scars, cysts or infections.

      Vaginal Pain
      Vaginal dryness. The most common cause of pain inside the vagina is lack of moisture. This can occur with certain medications, with certain medical conditions, or because you are not aroused. It can occur at certain times of your life such as during or just after pregnancy, while breastfeeding, or near or after menopause.

      Vaginitis. Another cause of vaginal pain is vaginitis — an inflammation of the vagina. The most common symptoms of vaginitis are discharge, itching and burning of the vagina and vulva. Vaginitis has many possible causes, such as yeast or bacterial infection.

      Vaginismus. Vaginismus is a spasm of the muscles at the opening of the vagina. It causes pain when your partner tries to enter the vagina. In some cases, vaginismus is present the first time a woman has — or tries to have — sex. The pain also may occur during a pelvic exam.

      Vaginismus also can be a response to a fear of some kind, such as being afraid of getting pregnant.

      Deep Pain
      Pain that starts deep inside may be a warning sign of an internal problem. Pain that happens when the penis touches the cervix can have many causes:

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      Problems with the uterus
      Endometriosis
      A pelvic mass
      Bowel or bladder disease
      Scar tissue (adhesions)
      Ovarian cysts

      Emotions Play a Role
      Pain during sex sometimes can be linked to a state of mind. Emotional factors, like memories or fears, can keep you from relaxing. Some women may feel guilty having sex. Or, some women may be afraid of getting pregnant or getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Sometimes, a past bad sexual experience, such as rape or sexual abuse, may be the cause. All these factors may make it hard to relax during sex. This prevents arousal and lubrication.
      Finally …
      Pain during sex is a sign there may be a problem. Talk to your doctor about the pain so that the cause can be found and treated as soon as possible. Proper treatment can help you enjoy your sex life.

  40. QUESTION:
    what i need to do if i there's a yellowish thing on my vaginal with smell?is it a disease?
    I don't know if it's normal to have some yellowish on your vaginal but there's a bad odor. I just want to know if i need to go to doctor to take medications? me & my husband are just wondering..

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginitis is usually characterized by a vaginal discharge and/or vulvar itching and irritation, and a vaginal odor might be present. The three diseases most frequently associated with vaginal discharge are BV (replacement of the normal vaginal flora by an overgrowth of anaerobic microorganisms, mycoplasmas, and Gardnerella vaginalis), trichomoniasis (T. vaginalis), and candidiasis (usually caused by Candida albicans). Cervicitis can sometimes cause a vaginal discharge. Although vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) usually is not transmitted sexually, it is included in this section because it is frequently diagnosed in women being evaluated for STDs.

      Depending on the type of infection you may have vaginal discharge. If you think you may be at risk for contracting an STD, it is important that you get tested even if you have no symptoms. Many infected individuals have no visible signs of a particular disease. If you are infected, you could develop complications from the STD and pass the infection to others. You can prevent serious health issues by getting tested early, so that you can seek treatment.

      Vaginal Discharge is a common symptom for women who is infected with sexually transmitted infection. A change in the color, smell, or amount of your vaginal discharge. Vaginal discharge is normally clear or white. Yellow or green discharge with a strong fishy odor. This may mean you have bacterial vaginosis. Curd-like, cream-colored discharge. This may mean you have a yeast infection.

      Vaginal discharge is a frequent presenting complaint. The three most common diseases associated with vaginal discharge are trichomoniasis, bacterial vaginosis, and candidiasis. However, a significant number of patients with vaginal discharge will have some other condition.

      The risk of becoming infected with an STD can be reduced or eliminated by decisions about personal behavior. Abstinence from sexual relations or a monogamous relationship with a partner who is not having sex outside are legitimate options. It is also wise to have an STD Testing regularly and avoid sexual contact with partners who are known to be infected with an STD, whose health status is unknown, who abuse drugs, or who are involved in prostitution.

  41. QUESTION:
    Why does my vagina constantly itch?
    it ONLY itches sooo much all the time. there's nothing else wrong with it but itches. there are no bumps no nothing. me and my bf has had sex for a year now but the itching didn't start since couple months ago. he is perfectly safe of any STIs or anything. When I try to ignore the itch it irritates me more that its almost a habit to scratch at it when nobody is looking.

    • ANSWER:
      The thing is its feminine itching ...
      Vaginal itching is a tingling or uneasy irritation of the skin of the vagina and the surrounding area (vulva). The itching may cause a desire to scratch the affected area.
      Common causes of vaginal itching include:

      Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      Pinworms (a parasitic infection mainly affecting children)

  42. QUESTION:
    What is the correct name for a vaginal disorder.......?
    that causes extreme pain during sex? and you can't get anything up there not even the smallest tampon and even if you are successful it is extremely painful? Whether you have delayed puberty(and over the age of 20) or not?
    If you don't know, DONT ANSWER!!!

    • ANSWER:
      It may be endometriosis, or dyspareunia. If you are positive you don't suffer from endometriosis, then read this.

      During sex a woman may feel pain in the vulva, at the opening of the vagina, within the vagina, or deep inside. Vulvar pain is pain felt on the surface (outside) of the vagina. Vaginal pain is felt within the vagina. Deep pain can occur in the lower back, pelvic region, uterus and bladder.
      Vulvar Pain
      Pain can occur when some part of the vulva is touched. The vulva may be tender or irritated from using soaps or over-the-counter vaginal sprays or douches. Other causes include scars, cysts or infections.

      Vaginal Pain
      Vaginal dryness. The most common cause of pain inside the vagina is lack of moisture. This can occur with certain medications, with certain medical conditions, or because you are not aroused. It can occur at certain times of your life such as during or just after pregnancy, while breastfeeding, or near or after menopause.

      Vaginitis. Another cause of vaginal pain is vaginitis — an inflammation of the vagina. The most common symptoms of vaginitis are discharge, itching and burning of the vagina and vulva. Vaginitis has many possible causes, such as yeast or bacterial infection.

      Vaginismus. Vaginismus is a spasm of the muscles at the opening of the vagina. It causes pain when your partner tries to enter the vagina. In some cases, vaginismus is present the first time a woman has — or tries to have — sex. The pain also may occur during a pelvic exam.

      Vaginismus also can be a response to a fear of some kind, such as being afraid of getting pregnant.

      Deep Pain
      Pain that starts deep inside may be a warning sign of an internal problem. Pain that happens when the penis touches the cervix can have many causes:

      Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
      Problems with the uterus
      Endometriosis
      A pelvic mass
      Bowel or bladder disease
      Scar tissue (adhesions)
      Ovarian cysts

      In any case, you are entitled to enjoy a healthy sexual life, so start looking for help before it damages your self esteem.

      VAGINISMUS! Ok?

  43. QUESTION:
    I have a weird bump on my vagina?
    I don't know the technical terms, sorry. It's not on the large opening part, which I think they call the lips, but it's on a part very close to that. It's a medium-sized bump, and it has kind of a painful itch to it like a mosquito bite, but only when it's touched. It seems like it might have something inside of it, but I'm not completely sure. Is this normal? Do I have some kind of disease?

    • ANSWER:
      It is very common,

      See below:

      What causes vulvar bumps/cysts?

      There are many causes for vulvar bumps and cysts, and depending on how they present, the resulting conditions can be anywhere from harmless (Fordyce spots) to serious (HPV). As Dr. Trisha Macnair and BBC Health note, "There are many reasons why lumps and bumps can form in the area of the vulva (the outer, visible skin folds of the female genital tract) and the vagina (the internal muscular passage), and most of these are relatively harmless."

      Dr. Frederick R. Jelovsek elaborates: "There are several skin structures on the vulva that can become infected or grow into nodules and bumps that can be quite irritating. As with any skin, there are hair follicles, sweat glands and other skin glands such as Bartholin glands, and vestibule glands. Infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria can cause skin lumps as well."

      http://www.vaginapagina.com/index.php?title=Vulvar_Bumps/Cysts

  44. QUESTION:
    What exactly is a yeast infection and how do you get it?

    • ANSWER:
      Due to the fact that you are in the women's health section, I'm going to assume you are talking about vaginal yeast infections.

      Vaginal Yeast Infection
      (Yeast Vaginitis)

      What is yeast?

      Yeast is a fungus scientifically referred to as Candida. The specific type of fungus most commonly responsible for vaginitis is Candida albicans. Yeast is commonly present on normal human skin and in areas of moisture, such as the mouth and vagina. In fact, it is estimated that between 20%-50% of healthy women normally carry yeast in the vaginal area.

      What is vaginitis?

      Vaginitis is inflammation of the vagina. Vaginitis is very common and is reported by as many as 75% of women at some point in their lives. Vaginitis can be caused by a number of infections, including bacteria (such as Gardnerella and gonorrhea), protozoans (such as trichomonas), and yeast (Candida). Vaginal yeast infection, which is the most common form of vaginitis, is often referred to as vaginal Candidiasis.

      ****What causes vaginal yeast infections?****

      Vaginal yeast infections occur when new yeast is introduced into the vaginal area, or when there is an increase in the quantity of yeast already present in the vagina relative to the quantity of normal bacteria. For example, when the normal, protective bacteria are eradicated by antibiotics (taken to treat a urinary tract, respiratory, or other types of infection) or by immunosuppressive drugs, the yeast can multiply, invade tissues, and cause irritation of the lining of the vagina (vaginitis).

      Vaginal yeast infections can also occur as a result of injury to the inner vagina, such as after chemotherapy. Also, women with suppressed immune systems (for example, those taking cortisone-related medications such as prednisone) develop vaginal yeast infections more frequently than women with normal immunity. Other conditions that may predispose women to developing vaginal yeast infections include diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, and taking oral contraceptives. The use of douches or perfumed vaginal hygiene sprays may also increase a woman's risk of developing a vaginal yeast infection.

      A vaginal yeast infection is not considered to be a sexually transmitted infection (STD), since Candida may be present in the normal vagina, and the condition does occur in celibate women. However, it is possible for men to develop symptoms of skin irritation of the penis from a yeast infection after sexual intercourse with an infected partner.

      What are the symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis?

      Vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis cause symptoms that are nonspecific, which means that aside from the yeast infection, other conditions can cause the identical symptoms. The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include:

      * burning,

      * soreness,

      * pain during intercourse and/or urination, and

      * vaginal discharge. (Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese.)

      Vulvitis can also cause local pain in addition to the above symptoms. Pain in the vulvar area is referred to as vulvodynia.

      In up to 5% of women, yeast vulvovaginitis may cause a recurrent problem. A recurrent yeast infection occurs when a woman has four or more infections in one year that are not related to antibiotic use. Recurrent yeast infections may be related to an underlying medical condition and may require more aggressive treatment.

      How are vaginal yeast infections and vulvitis diagnosed?

      Vaginal yeast infection is suggested when a cheesy white discharge is noted over the walls of the vagina, but the symptoms of vaginal yeast infection are nonspecific and may be a result of other conditions. To firmly establish the diagnosis and to rule out any other causes of the symptoms, your doctor may take a specimen scraped from the affected area for microscopic analysis or for culture in the laboratory. Identification of yeast under a microscope, when possible, is the least expensive and most rapid and accurate way to establish the diagnosis.

      What is the treatment for vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis?

      Vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis may be treated with antifungal medications that are applied topically in and around the vagina or with antifungal medications taken by mouth. Sometimes, mixed infections with more than one microbe can require combinations of treatments.

  45. QUESTION:
    I am having pressure in my vagina an?
    I found out that I have a yeast infection too I am trying to see if that is why I am having pain and stuff or could I be having a baby if anyone can help me out it wold be great.

    • ANSWER:
      Amanda,

      To determine if you are pregnanct I would recommend the best course of action would be to take a pregnancy test or see a doctor. As for regarding your yeast infection, The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include: 1. Burning, 2. Soreness, 3. Pain during intercourse and/or urination, and 4. Vaginal discharge. (Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese.)

      If you are experiencing such symptoms the I would recommend the use of monistat 7 treatment.You can find it at your local pharmacy and it will expunge your infection in no time. Also during this time I would recommend you circumscribe all sexual activity until the infection is completely gone.

  46. QUESTION:
    what kind of infections of the vagina can u get if ur a virgin?
    i know yeast and bacterial infections is there anything else and if u do have a bacterial infection are there different kinds

    • ANSWER:
      You don't mention if you're having any symptoms such as itching, burning, a discharge that is yellow or green or gray or if there's any odor coming from your vaginal area as these are some of the symptoms of a vaginal infection. If you are, and you need to see a doctor as soon as possible for treatment.

      Vaginal infections can happen whether you're a virgin or not because infections come from germs/bacteria. Virtually every woman will have a vaginal infection at least once in her life! Some women have them fairly often no matter what they do to prevent them (bummer). These germs can be introduced into the vagina in several ways:

      1) Candida (also known as thrush) can be caused if you have been on any antibiotics lately or if you have been douching too much. Normally a woman's vagina contains an appropriate level of good bacteria called lactobacilli. When the pH balance is upset, the level of good bacteria gets too low and the level of bad bacteria gets too high. infection can be the result, and it can be hard to re-establish the normal levels,The reason is, antibiotics kill good bacteria as well as bad, and some bacteria are necessary to prevent yeast overgrowth in the vaginal area. Eating yogurt daily (with active cultures) is helpful in preventing infections as the yogurt puts back some of the good bacteria. Some women need to take medication to prevent/treat infections.

      2) E. coli can be a bacteria that gets into your system because of wiping yourself in the wrong direction: a woman needs to wipe herself ONLY from front to back & drop the tissue. It only takes one swipe from back to front to bring bacteria up into the vaginal area.

      3) trichomoniasis, overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria or the Gardnerella organism can cause bacterial vaginosis- which can mimic other forms of vaginal infections. These are characterized by a foul or fishy odor, discharge, or discomfort. 2 to 5 percent of women who'd never had sex were found to have bacterial vaginosis. Anything that disturbs the normal pH of the vagina can cause BV to occur. (see above)

      BV develops when the natural pH balance of the vagina is disturbed by a douche, ejaculate or some other irritation.

      4) hpv/chlamidia- even if you are still a technical "virgin" you can contract these if the tip of the boy's penis has rubbed up against you in the moist vulvar/vaginal area, or if you/he happen to get ejaculate on your hands and touch your vagina

      5) masturbation can [rarely] be a cause if you are using anything inside yourself and haven't washed it since the last time you used it or have not washed your hands after using the bathroom or have germs on your hands and have been stimulating using your fingers inside yourself. This is nothing shameful or wrong... it just happens.

      There are many other diseases/infections women can pick up ... but these are the most common.

      The important thing to remember is, should you contract any discharge, irritation, or odor you need to see your gyn or pediatrician/family doctor as soon as possible.

      Hope this answers your question

  47. QUESTION:
    Can you get yeast infections from not shaving your pubic hair?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Jazzy Vega,

      No, not shaving your pubic hair will not cause a yeast infection. A yeast infection can be caused by candida over growth in your body, a poor diet, or poor hygiene. You want avoid being damp in your vaginal area which can lead to a yeast infection. The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include:

      1. Burning,

      2. Soreness,

      3. Pain during intercourse and/or urination, and

      Vaginal discharge. (Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese.)

  48. QUESTION:
    Why is the one side of my urethra itchy and a bit swollen?
    I'm 13 and ive noticed the left side of my urethra is swollen? It's quite itchy too? Why id this? It's starting to but me now. Only noticed it fot a couple of hours.
    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Search resultsAnnoying itchy urethra · Bladder, Ureters & Urethral ...
      Hi, I'm 33 years old, lately while ejaculating or urinating I have this weird itching sensation in my urethra. It starts from the bottom of my penis and it slowly ...
      www.steadyhealth.com/Annoying_itchy_urethra_t52841.html - Cached
      More results from steadyhealth.com »
      Urethra Itch - LIVESTRONG.COM - Lose Weight & Get Fit with ...
      Urethra Itch. Lifestyle, fitness & health information about Urethra Itch. Facts on Urethral Cancer, HIV & STD Symptoms, What Are the Causes of Vulvar Itching ...
      www.livestrong.com/urethra-itch - Cached
      More results from livestrong.com »
      Help! my vaginal area and urethra are itchy, what do i do ...
      for approximately 4 days now my urethra and vagina have been specially itchy. I havent shaved, applied any system flushes or had any sore spots, inflammation or
      www.vaginal-itchings.com/help-my-vaginal-area-and... - Cached

      Itching of the urethra
      I'm a 37 year old male and monogamous, I have a really bad itching sensation in my urethra that is most pronounced at the base of my penis and radiates the length or ...
      www.medhelp.org/posts/STDs/Itching-of-the-urethra/show/... - Cached.
      More results from medhelp.org »
      Itchy urethra treatment - MedHelp - Health community, health ...
      Hi I'm from Macedonia(and I am very sorry if I did some mistake in writing)I have 17 years.Last year i had redness on my penis-glans also a itchiness(I wasan't sexual ...
      healthquestions.medhelp.org/itchy-urethra-treatment - Cached

      Itchy urethra in men - MedHelp - Health community, health ...
      Lately my urethra has been itchy from the base of the scrotum all the way throughout the penis. I have no other symtoms or discharge, just the itching.
      healthquestions.medhelp.org/itchy-urethra-in-men - Cached

      My ('wee hole') urethra opening is itching. i have an UTI...
      [Nov 4, 2009] Best Answer: Could be. Try wiping every time you wee with a tissue dipped in a weak solution of bicarbonate of soda. Be careful how you dry yourself and ... ~ by Emm09765 ( 2 comments )
      uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091104075208... - Cached.
      ask: My Urethra is enlarged/swollen with NO other symptons ...
      There is no pain, even when touching it, no burning or itching, no problems when I pee. ... my urethra became swollen and something was buldging out a bit.
      www.empowher.com/community/ask/my-urethra-enlarged... - Cached

      My urethra is sore and itchy.? | Vaginal itching QA
      my urethra is sensitive and aching when it rubs versus my under garments, in fact it is a little scratchy and i also remarked that I've had discharge like
      www.vaginal-itchings.com/my-urethra-is-sore-and-itchy - Cached

      WHY IS MY URETHRA ITCHY?
      [Nov 9, 2008] Best Answer: Probably a mild urinary track infection Cranberry juice and AZO Standard (OTC) If it doesn't get better in a week see doctor. ~ by Glen P ( 3 comments )
      answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081109135235AAUSu3V - Cached

  49. QUESTION:
    Can you give yourself venereal warts?
    I have a small bump on my penis. The doctor took a look at it and said it looked like a venereal wart. The thing is I'm still a virgin. I go to the dermatologist tomorrow. What could it be?

    • ANSWER:
      The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a group of more than 100 different viruses that infect the human body. This year the FDA approved a vaccine that protects against four types of HPV. It protects against types 16 and 18 that cause most cervical cancers and types 6 and 11 that cause most genital warts (condyloma accuminata). There are 20 known types of HPV that infect the genital area. Most do not develop visible warts. HPV types16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 are less common in visible warts but are strongly associated with penile and vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasia (pre-cancerous changes) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the genital area especially cervical cancer and less frequently invasive vulvar cancer.

      Symptoms of condyloma accuminatum shows up as tiny blemishes that can be as small as a pinhead. The color can be gray, light brown, pale yellow, or pink. They have a rough feeling upon contact. Some people complain of itching.

      Condyloma acuminata can be sexually transmitted or non-sexually transmitted by inanimate objects (fomites). The lesions are generally transmitted through sexual contact and become clinically evident after a period of incubation of around one month. Although warts may appear three to six months after infection but latency periods of many months or even years have been reported. Developing genital warts during a long-term relationship does not necessarily imply infidelity.

      Lesions develop generally perianally or on the genitals. The oral mucosas may be involved as well, preferentially the nonkeratinizing mucosas such as lip, soft palate, floor of the mouth and lateral borders of the tongue. The gingiva is seldom affected. Some of the oral lesions are the result of autoinoculation from the genital lesions. Genital warts are highly contagious. As such, risk of transmitting the genital warts HPV infection to a sterile person becomes very high.

  50. QUESTION:
    Can this be a returning yeast infection ?
    My friend had a yeast infection a few months ago due to wearing tight pants .. She got it cured but sometimes when having sex she doesn't get as wet so it burns a little when she has intercourse it doesn't happen all the time just sometimes .. And the day after her discharge comes out clumpy sometimes it happens for two days then it leaves again she's gone to the gyn even got tested for diseases but the doctor says she's fine ..her vagina isn't itchy or swollen and it doesn't burn when she pee's ... What can this be ?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is itching in the vaginal and/or vulvar area. Other symptoms of vaginal yeast infection and vulvitis include: 1. Burning, 2. Soreness, 3. Pain during intercourse and/or urination, and 4. Vaginal discharge. (Vaginal discharge is not always present, but when it occurs, the discharge is odorless and typically has a whitish, thick appearance and texture, like cottage cheese or clumpy).

      If she is experiencing such symptoms then it's possible she has a infection. If not then it's just her ovulation occurring which is just the body cleaning itself.


vulvar itching