Tag Archives: small cauliflower bumps

Small Cauliflower Bumps

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Why does my friend have cauliflower looking bumps growing out his azz?
    We are both gay and he showed me its this baseball size patch of cauliflower looking bumps coming out his azz hole. He says guys still have sex with him and some even still rim him. Is that good or bad? What does that sound like? Is it a cream or pill my friend can take?
    0_o OMG! he is my roomate is it okay for us to share a toilet seat and tub? I dont want to catch what he has if it is something bad

    • ANSWER:
      Your friend has an STD.

      "Genital warts, caused by some types of HPV (human papilloma virus), can appear on the skin anywhere in the genital area as white or flesh-coloured, smooth, small bumps, or larger, fleshy, cauliflower-like lumps (see genital warts pictures). There are more than 100 different subtypes of HPV, and around 30 of them specifically affect the genitals. Other HPV subtypes cause warts to grow on different parts of the body, such as the hands."

      Very contagious too.

      Here's a page about it, it has pics too. Also do a google search for pics of genital warts, and see if any of the pics match his condition. He needs to see a doctor ASAP.

      http://www.avert.org/genital-warts.htm

      In answer to your toilet seat/tub question, I don't think it's quite that easily transferable, but I would suggest bleaching those areas down very often and keeping things as sanitary as possible. Better safe than sorry. There is NO cure for genital warts. Once you get them, they NEVER go away.

  2. QUESTION:
    How do I know if it is a wart?
    I have a small bump on my thumb knuckle. A few weeks ago I got a cut there and I picked it a few times as it was healing. Now it is a pink fleshy numb. It's not hard wrinkly or flesh colored. It also is no where else. My sister used to always get warts and mine doesn't look like hers. My friend told me its a wart, is it? Also if you need more gross info just comment that. Thank you! And if you might know what it is besides a wart that would be real nice!

    • ANSWER:
      Ever look at the white head of a piece of cauliflower? Notice how the head is made up of really small tube looking tentacle pieces all bunched together? Thats what a wart looks like and I can guarantee you if you picked it a few times it bled like a stuck pig. You don't have a wart. What you have is a wound that you couldn't keep your fingers off from enough to let it heal like it should. The fact that its pink says its still trying to heal fully. Knuckle wounds can heal differently because they are on the hands which move alot during the course of the day. The knuckle area is especially difficult because it's a hinging point on your finger so it hinges and moves keeping the wound open and moving when you use your fingers. Wash the dishes for your mom for a week, that will keep it clean and warm it should be healed up right by then. LOL

  3. QUESTION:
    My cat has a small, oddly shaped bump on neck?
    I was just petting my cat and I noticed a bump on the back/side of her neck. At first it felt like a tick, then I looked at it and it appears to be a small, cauliflower shaped bump. It's not red and doesn't seem painful as she lets me touch it. Does this sound like something that's harmless or could it be cancer or something? I'm definitely going to take her to the vet in a couple of days when I'm off work but I just want to know in the mean time what this could possibly be.

    • ANSWER:
      It's a fatty tumor. I wouldn't worry about it. My cat had that and when I say "had", I mean he's dead now. But that's because he was old. Not from the lump.

  4. QUESTION:
    what are all the infections/stds that can cause spots on penis?
    I have had some painless spots on my penis for over a month one is the size of my thumbnail (i have small hands) and one about 3/4 that size. They are painless at all times even when i poke them, and if they are raised it is so little you can't tell. Starting to get a larger spot on shaft that is a little larger, but is also painless.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, you didnt say what color they were, But from the sounds of it I'll bet you have genital warts. genital warts can look different but are mostly raised cauliflower looking bumps, you might need a magnifying glass to see the cauliflower look but they can be dark, skin color or even alittle lighter. If you dont have that you could have herpies but I doubt it. It really sounds like genital warts, if you only had this for a month or so this is strange because genital warts DO NOT grow that fast. ya never know this could be nothing but go to a Dr. and get looked at while you still have them visible. it is better to be safe then sorry. GOOD LUCK!

  5. QUESTION:
    How long after sex with an infected partner would genital warts take to appear?
    I had unprotected sex with a girl last thursday, so 13 days ago and now have small red bumps on the bottom of my glans and on the top of my shaft and well of couse I'm freaking out. They are tiny, like pimple size, and cover maybe 50% of the area.. Should I be worried they are genital warts? Or something else like balanitis.. They're really itchy and that's about it. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Genital warts are cauliflower shaped lesions and have no physical sensation. You are suffering from something else. May be a simple rash from a yeast infection or could be a transmittable STD. Go to a urologist and get checked out. May be as easy as taking an antibiotic or abstaining from sex until the bumps disappear. Millions of people can have the virus called HPV, but it can lie dormant for years. Go get checked out, so there is no chance of spreading an infection if that's what it is. Woman are much more unlikely to know they contracted genital warts because the warts may not be seen from the human eye. Your mate may want to go for a pap smear and gynecological exam also.

  6. QUESTION:
    I have a small cluster of cauliflower looking bumps on my vagina.?
    I am married, and my husband and I are both faithful first of all. So no comments about that please. It must not be an STD for that reason. They come up maybe once a month, just a couple of small pimple, cauliflower looking cluster bumps. They itch like crazy!!!!! With genital warts, they rarely itch! Any ideas, I'm thinking maybe ingrown hairs from shaving down there???

    • ANSWER:
      If you are certain it is not an STD...I would lean toward a calcification of some sort...have seen it a few times in a couple patients I had.

  7. QUESTION:
    Can you get genital warts out of the blue?
    or did my boyfriend cheat on me?
    I've been with him for nine months. He went out of town for a couple of days came back all loving and about two weeks later i have bumps showing up. help.

    • ANSWER:
      Not all bumps are genital warts. And, you cannot get them without someone giving them to you. Herpes can also give you bumps which are usually red with tiny vesicles of fluid on the top of each bump. Genital warts often look like small gray/white cauliflowers. You need to look at them, then decide whether it is time to see your doctor and get them tested and treated.

  8. QUESTION:
    My vagina on the inside is a darker color and has itty bitty bumps on the lips? Is this normal?
    Also i have white leakage out of my vagina daily is that normal?

    • ANSWER:
      *sigh* it's sad that we as a society are so afraid of our own working parts that so many people lack knowledge of what's normal and what's not. That's not a dig at you, that's my lament in general.

      The vagina is an internal structure. That's the tube inside of you. The outer parts are called the vulva. The lips are called the labia, and there are two sets: the labia majora (the big lips that grow hair), and the labia minora (the small lips tucked in underneath).

      The tiny scattered bumps on the labia minora are normal. There may be bumps on your labia majora; those are the hair follicles. If you get bumps that cluster, flatten out or look like little cauliflowers, that's NOT normal, and needs to be examined by a doctor.

      The darker color is normal. Sex hormones make the vulva darken (also makes men's genitals darken, too!). Darkening skin around your genitals means you are developing sexually. Some porn actors cover their genitals with makeup to make them lighter in color. Because people don't often see other people genitals besides porn actors, they get warped ideas about what normal should look like. Remember folks: Porn is NOT real and does not represent real life.

      The white leakage you get from your vagina is mucus that comes out of your cervix. Depending on your cycle, your body prepares different kinds of mucus to either block the cervix shut, or open it up to conceive. The mucus leaves your body in the form of white goo or panty crust. It's normal. it washes off. It should smell a little sour and musty. But if it smells fishy or like beer, or if it's foamy, chunky, runny, greenish, then you need to see a doctor as it may be a sign of infection.

      Scarleteen is a great website that has articles about your lady-parts and answers to a lot of your questions. http://www.scarleteen.com

  9. QUESTION:
    I have a small white bump on my ear can it be cauliflower ear?

    It isn't really swollen and there is no pain and the bump is on the outer part of my ear.

    • ANSWER:
      I just got one too! I have had it for about 4 days now and this morning I couldn't take it anymore and stuck a needle in it and gave it a good squeeze to have about a pea sized amount of hard white beige puss. Now my ear is still swollen and feels the same....Im going to the doctor
      in about an hour!
      or:
      A sebaceous cyst is a closed sac or cyst below the surface of the skin that has a lining that resembles the uppermost part of a hair follicle and fills with a fatty white, semi-solid material called sebum. Sebum is produced by sebaceous glands of the epidermis.

  10. QUESTION:
    How do I know if my hand warts are contagious or not?
    I have tons of hand warts, and I'm using Dr. Scholl's wart remover to get rid of them. But once they actually come off, there's still like hard skin there, is that still contagious? Or am I safe to touch others? Much help would be appreciated, thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Duncanshiftsix - Many of us have had a wart somewhere on our bodies at some time. Other than being a nuisance, most warts are harmless and go away on their own. More common in kids than in adults, warts are skin infections caused by viruses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) family. They can affect any area of the body, but tend to invade warm, moist places, like small cuts or scratches on the fingers, hands, and feet. Warts are usually painless unless they're on the soles of the feet or another part of the body that gets bumped or touched all the time. Kids can pick up HPV — and get warts — from touching anything someone with a wart has used, like towels and surfaces. Kids who bite their fingernails or pick at hangnails tend to get warts more often than kids who don't because they can expose less-protected skin and create open areas for a virus to enter and cause the wart.

      Types of warts include common warts. Usually found on fingers, hands, knees, and elbows, a common wart is a small, hard bump that's dome-shaped and usually grayish-brown. It has a rough surface that may look like the head of a cauliflower, with black dots inside. Warts don't generally cause any problems, so it's not always necessary to have them removed. Without treatment, it can take anywhere from 6 months to 2 years for a wart to go away. A doctor might decide to remove a wart if it's painful or interferes with activities because of the discomfort.

      Doctors have different ways of removing warts, including:
      using over-the-counter or prescription medications to put on the wart
      burning the wart off using a light electrical current)
      freezing the wart with liquid nitrogen (called cryosurgery)
      using laser treatment (with recalcitrant warts)
      Within a few days after the doctor's treatment, the wart may fall off, but several treatments might be necessary. Doctors don't usually cut off a wart because it can cause scarring and the wart may return.
      An older child with a simple wart on the finger, should ask the doctor about using an over-the-counter wart remedy that can help remove the wart. This treatment can take several weeks or months before you see results, but eventually the wart should crumble away from the healthy skin. Wart medicines contain strong chemicals and should be used with care because they can also damage the areas of healthy skin. .

      Also make sure that you soak the wart in warm water and remove dead skin on the surface of the wart with an emery board (that's never going to be used for nails) before applying the medicine. Be careful not to file into it. Keep the area of the wart covered while the medicine works. Don't pick at it to avoid spreading the virus to another part of the body or causing the wart to become infected You might also have heard that you can use duct tape to remove a wart. Talk to your doctor about whether this type of home treatment is OK for your child.

  11. QUESTION:
    What are some possible conditions that can cause sores in the genital area?
    Other than herpes,

    What conditions/std's can cause sores in the genital/anal area?

    • ANSWER:
      Syphilis
      In the first (primary) stage, about 10 days to six weeks after exposure: a painless sore (chancre) or many sores that will heal on their own. If not treated, infection spreads to the next stage. Secondary stage: skin rash that usually does not itch and clears on its own. Fever, swollen lymph glands, sore throat, patchy hair loss, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches, and tiredness. Latent (hidden) stage: symptoms disappear, but infection remains in body and can damage the brain, nerves, eyes, heart, blood vessels, liver, bones, and joints. Late stage: not able to coordinate muscle movements, paralysis, numbness, gradual blindness, dementia, and possibly death. Can be completely cured, but can be caught again, especially if both sex partners aren't treated.

      Genital warts
      Usually first appear as small, hard painless bumps on the penis, in the vaginal area, or around the anus. They sometimes can be hard to see, but if left untreated can turn into a fleshy, cauliflower-like appearance. Some people have no apparent symptoms. HPV is linked with a higher risk of cervical cancer in women.

      Gonorrhea
      Pain or burning when urinating. Yellowish and sometimes bloody discharge from the penis or vagina. But, many men have no symptoms. Can be completely cured, but can be caught again, especially if both sex partners aren't treated.

      Genital Herpes
      Small red bumps, blisters, or open sores on the penis, vagina, or areas close by. Also, vaginal discharge in women. Fever, headache, and muscle aches. Pain when urinating. Itching, burning, or swollen glands in genital area. Pain in legs, buttocks, or genital area. Symptoms may go away and then come back. Some people may have no symptoms. There is no cure. Treatment includes taking a medicine to lower severity of symptoms

      Chlamydia
      Most people have no symptoms. Abnormal discharge from the penis or vagina, pain in the testicles, and burning with urinating. Long-term irritation may cause lower abdominal pain, inflammation of the eyes and skin lesions. In women, it can cause inflammation of the pelvic organs pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Chlamydia an be completely cured, but can be caught again, especially if both sex partners aren't treated.

  12. QUESTION:
    What are the odds of transferring warts from the penis into the mouth/throat?
    Is it common, say if you performed oral sex on someone who has genital warts, that they could end up in your throat?

    • ANSWER:
      Genital warts are a sexually transmitted condition caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). Genital warts can be flat with stalks, or cauliflower-like, and are most often seen on the genitals or the area around the rectum.
      HPV can be divided into several sub-categories. Some types are more resistant to treatment than others, and some are associated with the early stages of cancer in the genitals.
      Genital warts are a very common viral sexually transmitted disease. The disease usually hits young people in their 20s.

      Genital warts develop in the mouth or throat of a person who has had oral sex with an infected person. Although rare, genital warts may develop in a person's mouth or throat if infected through oral sex.

      Warts may appear as small red or white bumps, they may grow alone or in cauliflower-like clusters, or they may be flat and barely visible.

      Genital warts are generally not painful, but may be itchy or uncomfortable. You may not realise that you have warts, particularly if they are small, inside the vagina or on your cervix.If you don't have visible genital warts and your smear result doesn't show signs of HPV, there is currently no other way of knowing whether or not you have the virus.

  13. QUESTION:
    How do you get HPV and how fast can it kill you?
    Im scared to get HPV but I need to know how you get it.

    • ANSWER:
      "Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI). The virus infects the skin and mucous membranes. There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas of men and women, including the skin of the penis, vulva (area outside the vagina), and anus, and the linings of the vagina, cervix, and rectum. You cannot see HPV. Most people who become infected with HPV do not even know they have it.

      http://www.cdc.gov/std/HPV/STDFact-HPV.htm

      Most people with HPV do not develop symptoms or health problems. But sometimes, certain types of HPV can cause genital warts in men and women. Other HPV types can cause cervical cancer and other less common cancers, such as cancers of the vulva, vagina, anus, and penis. The types of HPV that can cause genital warts are not the same as the types that can cause cancer.

      HPV types are often referred to as “low-risk” (wart-causing) or “high-risk” (cancer-causing), based on whether they put a person at risk for cancer. In 90% of cases, the body’s immune system clears the HPV infection naturally within two years. This is true of both high-risk and low-risk types.

      Genital warts usually appear as small bumps or groups of bumps, usually in the genital area. They can be raised or flat, single or multiple, small or large, and sometimes cauliflower shaped. They can appear on the vulva, in or around the vagina or anus, on the cervix, and on the penis, scrotum, groin, or thigh. Warts may appear within weeks or months after sexual contact with an infected person. Or, they may not appear at all. If left untreated, genital warts may go away, remain unchanged, or increase in size or number. They will not turn into cancer.

      Cervical cancer does not have symptoms until it is quite advanced. For this reason, it is important for women to get screened regularly for cervical cancer.

      Other less common HPV-related cancers, such as cancers of the vulva, vagina, anus and penis, also may not have signs or symptoms until they are advanced.

      Genital HPV is passed on through genital contact, most often during vaginal and anal sex. A person can have HPV even if years have passed since he or she had sex. Most infected persons do not realize they are infected or that they are passing the virus to a sex partner.

      Very rarely, a pregnant woman with genital HPV can pass HPV to her baby during vaginal delivery. In these cases, the child may develop warts in the throat or voice box – a condition called recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP).

      HPV can cause normal cells on infected skin or mucous membranes to turn abnormal. Most of the time, you cannot see or feel these cell changes. In most cases, the body fights off HPV naturally and the infected cells then go back to normal.

      •Sometimes, low-risk types of HPV can cause visible changes that take the form of genital warts.

      •If a high-risk HPV infection is not cleared by the immune system, it can linger for many years and turn abnormal cells into cancer over time. About 10% of women with high-risk HPV on their cervix will develop long-lasting HPV infections that put them at risk for cervical cancer. Similarly, when high-risk HPV lingers and infects the cells of the penis, anus, vulva, or vagina, it can cause cancer in those areas. But these cancers are much less common than cervical cancer.

      HPV infection. Approximately 20 million Americans are currently infected with HPV, and another 6.2 million people become newly infected each year. At least 50% of sexually active men and women acquire genital HPV infection at some point in their lives.

      Genital warts. About 1% of sexually active adults in the U.S. have genital warts at any one time.

      Cervical cancer. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2008, 11,070 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the U.S.

      Other HPV-related cancers are much less common than cervical cancer. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2008, there will be:

      •3,460 women diagnosed with vulvar cancer;
      •2,210 women diagnosed with vaginal and other female genital cancers;
      •1,250 men diagnosed with penile and other male genital cancers; and
      •3,050 women and 2,020 men diagnosed with anal cancer.
      Certain populations may be at higher risk for HPV-related cancers, such as gay and bisexual men, and individuals with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS).

      RRP is very rare. It is estimated that less than 2,000 children get RRP every year.

      A vaccine can now protect females from the four types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers and genital warts. The vaccine is recommended for 11 and 12 year-old girls. It is also recommended for girls and women age 13 through 26 who have not yet been vaccinated or completed the vaccine series.

      For those who choose to be sexually active, condoms may lower the risk of HPV, if used all the time and the right way. Condoms may also lower the risk

  14. QUESTION:
    i get dark brown discharge after i masturbate?
    also i have had small itchy bumps lower on my vagina for weeks. could i have an infection or std?

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, well, a dark brown discharge is most often a sign of old blood that is leaving your body. You may or may not have ovulated, this often causes spotting from the egg making it's way down the fallopian tube and cause tiny tears which bleed. This is normal, if it is the case.

      Tiny itchy bumps on your vaginal region, mostly if they are near your perineum (commonly called the 'taint' on men) could be genital warts. Often in the begining genital warts can be VERY itchy. Eventually it may end up looking like skin tags or the cauliflower bump look.

      I would highly recommend you visit a Dr. about this. If you do in fact HPV Genital Warts, you may be at an increased risk of cervical cancer. They are different strains, but it's best to keep on top of the situation. And if you have genital warts, you will need a medication, usually Condylox, to apply to the area to make the warts fall off.
      There are other methods to remove them, but this is the most common. It burns and is uncomfortable, but it may be worth the pain to speed up the process of removing them.
      Plus, you will need to keep your immune system in tip top shape to make sure future warts keep at bay....the better your immune system, the less likely you are to have more outbreaks.

      Good luck, be safe. I wish you good health.

  15. QUESTION:
    What does a doctor look for when you have a pap smear done?
    I am 23 and married. My husband and I have only been with each other.

    We have never had any other sexual contact with anyone else our whole lives so we have not contracted anything.

    So obviously I do not have any STDs, but I was curious to know if pap smears are tested for STDs.

    I have seen a lot of people on here with HPV and I was wonder how do they find out they have that.

    What else do they test for when you have a pap?

    It got me wondering about my yearly exams.
    I have had one pap smear exam every year since I turned 18.

    • ANSWER:
      A Pap test can save your life. It can find the earliest signs of cervical cancer - a common cancer in women. If caught early, the chance of curing cervical cancer is very high. Pap tests also can find infections and abnormal cervical cells that can turn into cancer cells. Treatment can prevent most cases of cervical cancer from developing.

      Getting regular Pap tests is the best thing you can do to prevent cervical cancer. About 13,000 women in America will find out they have cervical cancer this year. And in 2004, 3,500 women died from cervical cancer in the United States.

      It is important for all women to have pap tests, along with pelvic exams, as part of their routine health care. You need a Pap test if you are:

      21 years or older
      under 21 years old and have been sexually active for three years or more
      There is no age limit for the Pap test. Even women who have gone through menopause (when a woman's periods stop) need regular Pap tests.

      The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends the following:

      If you are younger than 30 years old, you should get a Pap test every year.
      If you are age 30 or older and have had three normal Pap tests for three years in a row, talk to your doctor about spacing out Pap tests to every two or three years.
      If you are ages 65 to 70 and have had at least three normal Pap tests and no abnormal Pap tests in the last 10 years, ask your doctor if you can stop having Pap tests.

      You should have a Pap test every year no matter how old you are if:

      You have a weakened immune system because of organ transplant, chemotherapy or steroid use
      Your mother was exposed to diethylstilbestrol (DES) while pregnant
      You are HIV-positive.

      A woman may be told that she has HPV when she receives her cervical screening result. If an HPV infection is present, changes in the appearance of the cells can sometimes be seen when they are looked at under a microscope during cervical screening.

      Some women with particular types of HPV may notice visible warts, which appear as flat smooth small bumps, or larger cauliflower-like lumps. Warts do not lead to cancer and may appear on their own or in groups. They may itch, but are usually painless. HPV produces visible warts only in around 30% of people, leaving 70% of people with HPV who have no signs of the infection.

  16. QUESTION:
    What should you do if you have genital warts?
    Signs, symptoms, what causes it, how does it look like, and what if it bleeds

    • ANSWER:
      Genital warts pictures
      Please click on the image you would like to view

      Genital warts on the vaginaGenital warts on the penisThese pictures are intended to give information for educational purposes and are not a replacement for medical diagnosis. If you are worried you might have an STD it is essential to seek medical advice, even if your symptoms do not look like these pictures. See more STD pictures
      If symptoms do appear then the infected person may notice pinkish/white small lumps or larger cauliflower-shaped lumps on the genital area. Genital warts can appear on or around the penis, the scrotum, the thighs or the anus. In women genital warts can develop around the vulva or inside the vagina and on the cervix. If a woman has warts on her cervix, this may cause slight bleeding or, very rarely, an unusual coloured vaginal discharge. Warts may occur singly or in groups. The warts may itch, but they are usually painless. Sometimes genital warts can be difficult to spot. In severe cases, it is possible for genital warts to spread from the genitals to the area around the anus, even if anal intercourse has not occurred.

      Occasionally, people can confuse skin problems caused by other STDs (such as genital herpes, syphilis or molluscum) with genital warts. Other people may become very worried because they mistake perfectly normal and non-infectious lumps and bumps for genital warts. Conditions that may be confused with genital warts include:

      Pearly penile papules - small white or skin-coloured bumps that, when numerous, appear in a ring around the edge of the head of the penis. More rarely, similar papules may be found on the vulva.
      Angiokeratomas - bright red or purple spots that look a little like blood blisters.
      Sebaceous glands (also known as 'Fordyce spots') - hard white, yellowish or skin-coloured little bumps that may be found all over the skin of the penis and scrotum in men, and the vulva in women. Sebaceous glands produce a substance called sebum, which keeps the skin healthy.
      Pimples or spots - caused by blocked sebaceous glands. Pimples and spots can form just as easily around the genital area as they do on the face, and may become sore and inflamed in a similar way.

  17. QUESTION:
    my ear has a bump on it from my piercing what do i do?
    i got it pierced at claires half a year ago. I got the midway cartilage done and everything was fine but now I have a ugly bump. kind of looks like a water bubble. what do I do? can I save it?
    im wearing a stud in it and it is tight on my ear and when I lay on it then it puts more pressure so im assuming that's why I have it. BUT I cant change to another earring because it doesn't fit.

    • ANSWER:
      So just got some cartialge piercings today and the piercer said if bumbs start forming break open a vitamin e capsule and put it on the bumb every night. Should go away after about 2 weeks. I told him i never keloid with any of my scars and he said just in case (because i got a bunch close together) they might irritate eachother.

      Also if they even remotely snagged your piercing when they did it, they ripped your cartilage. My friend did the same thing in high school and she has a huge lump on the back of her ear for life now unless she gets it surgically removed.

      Next time go to a shop, ear guns are not safe anyways.

      Go get dangly earrings or small hoops to take the pressure off, thats a bad thing!! There should aways be room on new piercings for swelling! I would honestly go to your nearest shop and ask them to help you change it out until the swelling goes down (a few weeks) and i would do it tomorrow before you develope cauliflower ear! Dont take out the jewelry and just let it close though or you could trap bacteria and have an even worse problem.

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the risk of getting Genital Warts?
    What are the risk of me (male) getting Genital Warts from a female who has had an outbreak in the past but currently she has not had one since 01/07. Or course I will be using CONDOM.

    • ANSWER:
      Genital warts, also known as condylomata acuminata or venereal warts, are one of the most common types of sexually transmitted diseases. As the name suggests, genital warts affect the moist tissues of the genital area. They may look like small, flesh-colored bumps or have a cauliflower-like appearance. Genital warts may be as small as 1 millimeter in diameter — smaller than the width of a ballpoint pen refill — or may multiply into large clusters.

      In women, genital warts can grow on the vulva, the walls of the vagina, the area between the external genitals and the anus, and the cervix. In men, they may occur on the tip or shaft of the penis, the scrotum or the anus. Genital warts can also develop in the mouth or throat of a person who has had oral sexual contact with an infected person.

      Although genital warts can be treated with medications and surgery, they are a serious health concern. The virus that causes them — the human papillomavirus (HPV) — has been associated with cervical cancer. It has also been linked with other types of genital cancers, such as cancer of the penis.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/genital-warts/DS00087

  19. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms and signs of hpv?
    I'm 17 and is sexually active. I don't smoke or drink and I have a odd spot on my cheek.

    • ANSWER:
      Most people with HPV do not develop symptoms or health problems from it. In 90% of cases, the body’s immune system clears HPV naturally within two years. But, sometimes, HPV infections are not cleared and can cause:

      Genital warts
      Rarely, warts in the throat -- a condition called recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, or RRP. When this occurs in children it is called juvenile-onset RRP (JORRP).
      Cervical cancer and other, less common but serious cancers, including cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and oropharynx (back of throat including base of tongue and tonsils).

      The types of HPV that can cause genital warts are not the same as the types that can cause cancers. There is no way to know which people who get HPV will go on to develop cancer or other health problems.

      Genital warts usually appear as a small bump or group of bumps in the genital area. They can be small or large, raised or flat, or shaped like a cauliflower. Health care providers can diagnose warts by looking at the genital area during an office visit. Warts can appear within weeks or months after sexual contact with an infected partner—even if the infected partner has no signs of genital warts. If left untreated, genital warts might go away, remain unchanged, or increase in size or number. They will not turn into cancer.

      Cervical cancer usually does not have symptoms until it is quite advanced. For this reason, it is important for women to get regular screening for cervical cancer. Screening tests can find early signs of disease so that problems can be treated early, before they ever turn into cancer.

      Other HPV-related cancers might not have signs or symptoms until they are advanced and hard to treat. These include cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and oropharynx (back of throat including base of tongue and tonsils). For signs and symptoms of these cancers, see www.cancer.gov

  20. QUESTION:
    Im negative for stds and have no insurance, what r these bumps cause from?
    im 23 years old and noticed for many many years these bumps that form where my vagina lips touch, ive been tested for all stds to be safe and all results came back negative. i dont have health insurance so im unable to go see a obgyn. i already paid for the std testing and i had a full pallet of testing. what could these be and how do i get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like it could be HPV this is a sexually transmitted virus its also the virus that causes warts, usually regular std screening miss this because typical signs are on the cervix @ which is usually caught when you have a pap smear. Usually your gynecologist perform this text. Only time this is caught during a regular std screening is if the bumps are abviously looking like warts that are fleshy raised bumps that could have a cauliflower look. Sometimes the warts are just too small to recognise as warts. This also could be hair bumps or ingrown hairs. Every sexually active woman should get a yearly pap smear this is different than a std screening,. If you cant afford this then go to your local health department and tell them you have no income. Get on the internet and type in (your city health department) the number should pop up.

  21. QUESTION:
    I have a bump in my vagina if I play with it while I'm on my period will I start to bleed?

    • ANSWER:
      You're casually washing yourself or perhaps attending to needs in the Ladies' Room, and you notice something out of the ordinary. You feel a bump in your genital area, and immediately, you worry about infection, sexually transmitted diseases, or any number of scary outcomes. In fact, lumps and bumps on or around your vagina are quite commonplace and usually nothing to worry about.

      To understand bumps on the vagina, it is important to understand the anatomy. Your vagina is actually a long, hollow tube that doesn't properly start until well inside the body. Most lumps and bumps are discovered on the outside of the body, properly called the vulva. This is the inner lips of the genitals, including the clitoris and all the smooth skin within the labia majora. The labia majora are the lips commonly covered with pubic hair. You can have lumps and bumps to this part of the genitalia, but the most common site of concerning bumps is on the vulva.

      You can have bumps and lumps on the inner part of the genitalia that are large and small, painful and painless. Sometimes, you will note discharge from the bump, and this is an important symptom to make note of when you see your doctor. A simple bath in warm water can occasionally relieve the pain of some bumps, but you should have any persistent bump fully examined by a doctor to rule out any serious conditions.

      Causes of Bumps on the Vagina
      One of the most common benign causes of lumps on the vaginal area is cysts. These are blocked glands that often swell up and can become painful. Sometimes, they can look like pimples, and you may be tempted to squeeze them to relieve the pain and pressure. This is generally not a good idea because you open up the area to infection from the rest of the vulva. It is better to allow these cysts to open on their own and drain naturally. For large and very painful cysts, it may be necessary to see a doctor for drainage and an antibiotic.

      Two types of cysts are common in the female genital region. Skene's duct cysts often occur near the urethra, or the area where urine comes out. This area is usually between the clitoris and the vaginal opening. The other type of cyst is Bartholin cysts. These usually occur low on the labia majora and can cause a great deal of pain.

      Blocked hair follicles are common in the genital region and can occur on the inside of the vulva. This is often called an ingrown hair, and they will need draining if they are big and painful. Otherwise, they tend to resolve on their own.

      Similarly, you can have a clogged sweat gland in the genital region. One type of infection of a clogged gland is called Hidradenitis suppurativa, and this can easily lead to an infection and become painful. Antibiotics are often needed to treat this sort of clog. You can also have painless Fox Fordyce, and this type usually required an anti-inflammatory cream and other treatment modalities.

      A painless infection called Molluscum contagiosum can cause small, pearly bumps that have an indentation in the center. Most of the time, these bumps resolve on their own, and do not require medical attention. Finally, skin tags are common anywhere on the body, and they can appear around the vaginal area. It is recommended that you get these tags assessed for skin cancer or some other form of infection to be safe.

      When to See Your Doctor
      Some bumps are more serious than other bumps and definitely require treatment by a doctor. For instance, genital herpes can start out as a small opening that looks like a bug bite. It can turn into an itchy, painful mass that requires special medications to treat. It can turn into a blister, and eventually that blister opens into an ulcer.

      Bumps that look like cauliflower are often a sign of genital warts. These warts are caused by a type of the human papilloma virus, and they are transmitted through sexual contact. They feel rough when you touch them, and they often spread. Cold treatment therapy is the common treatment for this type of bump.

      You should probably see your doctor for any bump on the vagina that does not resolve itself within a few days. Even for benign, non-sexually transmitted disease related bumps can evolve into something that requires an antibiotic or further medical attention. If sitting in a bath of warm water doesn't make the bump go away, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor to get it checked out. so first be fit and then play with it ok be relax and take care

  22. QUESTION:
    I have bumps on my fingers and they hurt when I press on them, what are they?
    I just got these bumps on my fingers a couple weeks ago. It started with my right pointer finger and it has spread to a few other fingers on the other hand but it is not spreading anywhere else but my hands. They don't itch, they just hurt when they are pressed on and they are bothering me a lot. Some aren't very visible. There is a big cluster of them on my right pointer finger on the side and a couple on the top of my finger. What are these bumps???

    • ANSWER:
      Warts

      A wart is generally a small, rough growth, typically on a human’s hands or feet but often other locations, that can resemble a cauliflower or a solid blister. They are caused by a viral infection, specifically by human papillomavirus 2 and 7. There are as many as 10 varieties of warts, the most common considered to be mostly harmless. It is possible to get warts from others; they are contagious and usually enter the body in an area of broken skin.[1] They typically disappear after a few months but can last for years and can recur

      So visit your doctor for treatment

  23. QUESTION:
    What does a genital wart look like, how do you get one? How do you get rid of one?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      Genital warts are also called Venereal Warts, Condylomata Acuminata, Moist Warts, Fig Warts and Verruca Acuminata. These are one of the most common Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) in general population and more contagious than any other types of warts. They are caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and can be very contagious. Genital warts spread easily through skin-to-skin contact, usually during oral, anal or genital sex with an infected partner. They can also can spread through secondary contact such as through sharing a towel with an infected person.

      Genital warts grow in the moist tissues of the genital areas, groins, pubis, anus, inner thighs, in the mouth and less common in between toes.

      Genital warts are usually soft, moist, pink to red in color, small flat bumps or thin and pointed in shape. Occasionally, they are pigmented. The warts may grow from tiny papules into 4 inches. They have a variety of appearances. They can be either flat or resemble raspberries or a cauliflower, and not scaly like other warts. Genital warts may grow in a single lesion or in multiples (clusters).

      Small size genital warts are nuisance but as they grow into larger size or with numerous clusters, they can pose problems in urination, defecation, sexual intercourse and childbirth.

      Since new genital warts may take up to months to appear, individuals may not know that they have warts and could simply pass it on to their sexual partner without even knowing it. Genital warts tend to reappear sporadically and infected individuals may suffer from few outbreaks before they are fully cured.

      Factors that increase the risk of developing genital warts include multiple sexual partners, infection with another STD, pregnancy, anal intercourse, poor personal hygiene and heavy perspiration.

      Although there is still no HPV cures and genital warts can clear up without treatment in some cases, it is strongly advised to seek treatment as soon as genital warts come to your knowledge. This is because hpv infection may increase the risk of malignant growth.

      Widely use treatment include Cryotherapy (Freezing warts with extreme cold liquid such as nitrogen), Surgery (laser treatment, electrocautery, chemical cautery and electrosurgery) and natural products home remedies.

      You can find out the best product for genital warts removal with 97% success rate and no side effect reported by many users at below link. Beware that fake products are sold online through different channels. Below link is the direct link to the manufacturer.

  24. QUESTION:
    Bumps inside vagina could it be herpes?
    I just recently went and got tested for herpes. The test results wont be back for seven days so I need a little advice. I dont have vaginal discharge, itching, or painful uritation. I do have little rash like sores. The doctor said that it is just a precaution but I need another opinion. Could it still be herpes if all I have a small rash like marks?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,
      From your symptoms, it looks like Bartholin's abscess or cysts. Other possibilities are sebaceous cysts (accumulations of secretions that can occur Fanywhere on the skin or mucosal surfaces), lipomas (fatty deposits) ,fibromas (fibrous tissue deposits) or viral warts(small raised pimples to a mass of large, cauliflower-like growths. The virus that causes them is passed on during sex). An examination by a gynecologist will be the best as it is only after an examination that it will become clear what the swellings that you have noticed are due to.
      Hope it helps. Take care and regards.

  25. QUESTION:
    Does this sound like a common wart?
    It is a small round bump (dome shaped) that is kinda rough on the top, but doesn't really have texture. It is painless, it kinda looks like a solid blister. I've had warts before but this one has a reddish color to it so I wasn't sure.

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe verruca vulgaris - these have a rough surface. They are firm and raised and may have a cauliflower surface type look. They are thickened bumps called papules or plaques. May appear in any part of the body, but are more common on the knuckles, fingers, elbows and knees. Often they have tiny dark spots which are from blood vessels that have clotted.

  26. QUESTION:
    I have small hard to touch bumps on my vagina, been there for one month.?
    I pulled out the hair on the center of each pimple-like looking bumps but still same. It didnt spread though. It's not itchy or painful. It's just there and bother's me. It all started a month before. I remember shaving while I have my monthly period. I went to the OB gyne and she gave me candibec cream, an antifungal medication. But I stopped using it after 6days because it makes me itchy. Now I dont put anything. Im just wondering what it is? It doesnt look like Herpes because it doesnt look like lesions. Not warts because its not even cauliflower shaped. Idk help im really bothered thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor can give you a blood test.

  27. QUESTION:
    Do you think this is genital warts?
    I'm scared that I have genital warts. I have these very small little white bumps on the outside of my vaginal lips, they are hardly even noticeable. They do not itch, and they do not look at all like those that I've seen in photos online. Do you think that's what it could be? Yes, I have had unprotected sex with a few people as well as protected sex with a number of people in the past few months. The first time I noticed these little bumps was like 3 days after unprotected sex with a new guy. I am going to the doctor, but not for another week or so.

    Also, 'down there' but not in the vaginal area, I've been getting pimples, 2 so far on my thigh (close to bikini line, but more on my thigh) and another 1 on my stomach in the crease (sorry for being graphic) where my stomach folds, in the droopy 'kangaroo pouch' that I got from having kids.

    • ANSWER:
      The only way to absolutely sure of what you have is to see a physician.

      Genital warts usually appear as soft, moist, pink, or flesh-colored swellings, usually in the genital area. They can be raised or flat, single or multiple, small or large, and sometimes cauliflower shaped. They can appear on the vulva, in or around the vagina or anus, on the cervix, and on the penis, scrotum, groin, or thigh. After sexual contact with an infected person, warts may appear within weeks or months, or not at all. The only way to diagnose is to be examined by a doctor.

      You should also know that the best way to prevent most STD's, including HIV is by using acondom every time you engaged in sex. For most STD's as well as HIV it only takes one unprotected sex act to become infected.

      Good luck.

  28. QUESTION:
    Is this too many piercings on one ear?
    right now i have:

    left ear: cartilage and double lobe
    right ear: double lobe

    i want to add on my right ear tragus, double cartilage. is that too much on my right ear and not much on my left? should i add a triple lobe on my left? idk what to do! im 15 btw.

    thanks!

    ps: i cant get the tragus on my left ear because there is an old, small cyst-like bump and i don't want it near that. and like i said, i have a cartilage on my left so i cant put the double over there for other reasons. and i don't want to just add another cartilage to my left because my current one was pierced wrong.

    • ANSWER:
      They're your ears, do what makes you happy! Be careful though, you don't want to get cauliflower ear, and too many piercings can do that! Ask your local professional piercer when you go in to get any of that done

  29. QUESTION:
    Why does my ear cartilage keep popping?
    I keep developing these small but hard bumps in the cartilage of my upper ear. When I squeeze them, I hear a pop and the bump squishes under my finger, then it feels like liquid is stuck inside the cartilage. After a few days, it once again hardens into a bump.

    I am not a wrestler, so I don't see how it could be cauliflower ear. Any idea what this is?
    I don't know why I post here anymore -_-

    • ANSWER:
      It could be a sebaceous cyst. A common and effective method of treatment involves placement of a heating pad or hot compress directly on the cyst for about fifteen minutes, twice daily, for about 10 days (depending on size and location of the cyst). Make sure you use clean or sterile cloths or pads. This method works by bringing the wax-like material inside of the cyst to a temperature at which it melts, and can be reabsorbed and processed by the body, as a small amount of oily fluid. This methodology is not applicable for non-sebaceous cysts, however, as other varieties of cysts do not contain the same hardened sebum deposits, and therefore do not melt to be reabsorbed by the body.

      Check here.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sebaceous_cyst
      http://womenshealth.about.com/cs/dermatology/a/sebaceouscyst.htm

  30. QUESTION:
    Can u get genitalia warts from a normal wart from your finger?
    If u can how do you get rid of it

    • ANSWER:
      Genital warts, also known as condylomata acuminata or venereal warts, are one of the most common types of sexually transmitted diseases. As the name suggests, genital warts affect the moist tissues of the genital area. They may look like small, flesh-colored bumps or have a cauliflower-like appearance. Genital warts may be as small as 1 millimeter in diameter — smaller than the width of a ballpoint pen refill — or may multiply into large clusters.

      In women, genital warts can grow on the vulva, the walls of the vagina, the area between the external genitals and the anus, and the cervix. In men, they may occur on the tip or shaft of the penis, the scrotum or the anus. Genital warts can also develop in the mouth or throat of a person who has had oral sexual contact with an infected person.

  31. QUESTION:
    Do I have warts on my tongue?
    I have these bumps on the very back of my tongue. They do not hurt and are the same colour as my tongue. There are a few and I have tried brushing them with my tooth brush but that doesn't really make any difference. I am really worried about this, I have two warts on my hand. I am worried I may have passed this onto someone I have kissed? Also, if they are warts, how are they treated and are warts in the mouth assciated with any other types of warts? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Oral warts vary in appearance from smooth, small, and slightly raised lesions to cauliflower like or spiked masses with prominent folds or projections. You can get single or multiple warts, but they are diagnosed by their appearance, so a doctor or experienced nurse or a dentist needs to see them.

      Sometimes what seem like warts are unusual in appearance - they get ulcerated, or grow rapidly. If that is the case, a doctor will usually perform a biopsy (cut a small section out) and send it to a laboratory to rule out cancer.

      The cause of oral warts is the human papilloma virus and it is not common unless you have a compromised immune system - HIV Aids sufferers are prone to them, but they are otherwise not too common. Treatments are things like laser surgery, electro-cauterization (burning) and cryosurgery (freezing) but they are not all that successful - the warts come back afterwards. However, most warts disappear without treatment eventually, and they are very hard to transmit to another person.

  32. QUESTION:
    Are these symptoms of HPV or something else?
    I have HPV. I was diagnosed with it the past spring and had to LEEP procedure to laser out some abnormal cells on my cervix. Since then, I've had sex with my new boyfriend. However, I'm been incredibly irritated since we started having sex. I noticed a tiny red bump right near my vaginal opening and my right vaginal lip has been swollen. My lips have always gotten swollen though ever since I first got my period. I never thouhgt much about it. Is this simply a wart from the HPV strain? From what I've read online, it doesn't match the description. I have a follow up pap test in a month so I don't want to make another appointment to get this checked out. I don't want to scare my boyfriend either because I told him I have HPV but that I've never had an outbreak. Is this an outbreak or something else?

    • ANSWER:
      Genital warts usually appear as soft, moist, pink, or flesh-colored swellings, usually in the genital area. They can be raised or flat, single or multiple, small or large, and sometimes cauliflower shaped. They can appear on the vulva, in or around the vagina or anus, on the cervix. If this sounds like what you have, there is a good chance it is from your HPV. Make sure your boyfriend uses a condom, or else he may not like what he gets.

  33. QUESTION:
    How do I have HPV and will it go away?
    My doctor says I have a slight HPV infection! What did I get this from? Can my body just have made it? I have the shots... Why did i get it?! Will it go away? Am I going to get warts or something? Can my boyfriend get something through intercourse? I used to get a lot of bladder and yeast infections... could this be a reason?

    • ANSWER:
      Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI). The virus infects the skin and mucous membranes. There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas of men and women, including the skin of the penis, vulva (area outside the vagina), and anus, and the linings of the vagina, cervix, and rectum. You cannot see HPV. Most people who become infected with HPV do not even know they have it.

      Most people with HPV do not develop symptoms or health problems. But sometimes, certain types of HPV can cause genital warts in men and women. Other HPV types can cause cervical cancer and other less common cancers, such as cancers of the vulva, vagina, anus, and penis. The types of HPV that can cause genital warts are not the same as the types that can cause cancer.

      HPV types are often referred to as “low-risk” (wart-causing) or “high-risk” (cancer-causing), based on whether they put a person at risk for cancer. In 90% of cases, the body’s immune system clears the HPV infection naturally within two years. This is true of both high-risk and low-risk types.

      Genital warts usually appear as small bumps or groups of bumps, usually in the genital area. They can be raised or flat, single or multiple, small or large, and sometimes cauliflower shaped. They can appear on the vulva, in or around the vagina or anus, on the cervix, and on the penis, scrotum, groin, or thigh. Warts may appear within weeks or months after sexual contact with an infected person. Or, they may not appear at all. If left untreated, genital warts may go away, remain unchanged, or increase in size or number. They will not turn into cancer.

      Cervical cancer does not have symptoms until it is quite advanced. For this reason, it is important for women to get screened regularly for cervical cancer.

      Other less common HPV-related cancers, such as cancers of the vulva, vagina, anus and penis, also may not have signs or symptoms until they are advanced.

      Genital HPV is passed on through genital contact, most often during vaginal and anal sex. A person can have HPV even if years have passed since he or she had sex. Most infected persons do not realize they are infected or that they are passing the virus to a sex partner.

      Very rarely, a pregnant woman with genital HPV can pass HPV to her baby during vaginal delivery. In these cases, the child may develop warts in the throat or voice box – a condition called recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP).

      HPV can cause normal cells on infected skin or mucous membranes to turn abnormal. Most of the time, you cannot see or feel these cell changes. In most cases, the body fights off HPV naturally and the infected cells then go back to normal.

      Sometimes, low-risk types of HPV can cause visible changes that take the form of genital warts.

      If a high-risk HPV infection is not cleared by the immune system, it can linger for many years and turn abnormal cells into cancer over time. About 10% of women with high-risk HPV on their cervix will develop long-lasting HPV infections that put them at risk for cervical cancer. Similarly, when high-risk HPV lingers and infects the cells of the penis, anus, vulva, or vagina, it can cause cancer in those areas. But these cancers are much less common than cervical cancer.

      HPV infection. Approximately 20 million Americans are currently infected with HPV, and another 6.2 million people become newly infected each year. At least 50% of sexually active men and women acquire genital HPV infection at some point in their lives.

      Genital warts. About 1% of sexually active adults in the U.S. have genital warts at any one time.

      Cervical cancer. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2008, 11,070 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the U.S.

      Other HPV-related cancers are much less common than cervical cancer. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2008, there will be:

      3,460 women diagnosed with vulvar cancer;
      2,210 women diagnosed with vaginal and other female genital cancers;
      1,250 men diagnosed with penile and other male genital cancers; and
      3,050 women and 2,020 men diagnosed with anal cancer.
      Certain populations may be at higher risk for HPV-related cancers, such as gay and bisexual men, and individuals with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS).

      RRP is very rare. It is estimated that less than 2,000 children get RRP every year.

      A vaccine can now protect females from the four types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers and genital warts. The vaccine is recommended for 11 and 12 year-old girls. It is also recommended for girls and women age 13 through 26 who have not yet been vaccinated or completed the vaccine series.

      For those who choose to be sexually active, condoms may lower the risk of HPV, if used all the time and the right way. Condoms may also lower the risk of developing HPV-related diseases, such as genital warts and cervical cancer. But HPV can infect areas that are not covered by a condom—so condoms may not fully protect against HPV. So the only sure way to prevent HPV is to avoid all sexual activity.

      Individuals can also lower their chances of getting HPV by being in a mutually faithful relationship with someone who has had no or few sex partners. However, even people with only one lifetime sex partner can get HPV, if their partner was infected with HPV. For those who are not in long-term mutually monogamous relationships, limiting the number of sex partners and choosing a partner less likely to be infected may lower the risk of HPV. Partners less likely to be infected include those who have had no or few prior sex partners. But it may not be possible to determine if a partner who has been sexually active in the past is currently infected.

      There are important steps girls and women can take to prevent cervical cancer. The HPV vaccine can protect against most cervical cancers (see above). Cervical cancer can also be prevented with routine cervical cancer screening and follow-up of abnormal results. The Pap test can identify abnormal or pre-cancerous changes in the cervix so that they can be removed before cancer develops. An HPV DNA test, which can find high-risk HPV on a woman’s cervix, may also be used with a Pap test in certain cases. The HPV test can help healthcare professionals decide if more tests or treatment are needed. Even women who got the vaccine when they were younger need regular cervical cancer screening because the vaccine does not protect against all cervical cancers.

      There is currently no vaccine licensed to prevent HPV-related diseases in men. Studies are now being done to find out if the vaccine is also safe in men, and if it can protect them against HPV and related conditions. The FDA will consider licensing the vaccine for boys and men if there is proof that it is safe and effective for them. There is also no approved screening test to find early signs of penile or anal cancer. Some experts recommend yearly anal Pap tests for gay and bisexual men and for HIV-positive persons because anal cancer is more common in these populations. Scientists are still studying how best to screen for penile and anal cancers in those who may be at highest risk for those diseases.

      Generally, cesarean delivery is not recommended for women with genital warts to prevent RRP in their babies. This is because it is unclear whether cesarean delivery actually prevents RRP in infants and children.

      The HPV test on the market is only used as part of cervical cancer screening. There is no general test for men or women to check one’s overall “HPV status.” HPV usually goes away on its own, without causing health problems. So an HPV infection that is found today will most likely not be there a year or two from now. For this reason, there is no need to be tested just to find out if you have HPV now. However, you should get tested for signs of disease that HPV can cause, such as cervical cancer.

      Genital warts are diagnosed by visual inspection. Some health care providers may use acetic acid, a vinegar solution, to help identify flat warts. But this is not a sensitive test so it may wrongly identify normal skin as a wart.

      Cervical cell changes (early signs of cervical cancer) can be identified by routine Pap tests. The HPV test can identify high-risk HPV types on a woman’s cervix, which can cause cervical cell changes and cancer.

      As noted above, there is currently no approved test to find HPV or related cancers in men. But HPV is very common and HPV-related cancers are very rare in men.

      There is no treatment for the virus itself, but a healthy immune system can usually fight off HPV naturally. There are treatments for the diseases that HPV can cause:

      Visible genital warts can be removed by patient-applied medications, or by treatments performed by a health care provider. Some individuals choose to forego treatment to see if the warts will disappear on their own. No one treatment is better than another.

      Cervical cancer is most treatable when it is diagnosed and treated early. There are new forms of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy available for patients [see www.cancer.org ]. But women who get routine Pap testing and follow up as needed can identify problems before cancer develops. Prevention is always better than treatment.

      Other HPV-related cancers are also more treatable when diagnosed and treated early. There are new forms of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy available for patients. [see www.cancer.org ]

  34. QUESTION:
    for the guys with geniital warts,do u expeience any discomfort within the penis during the warts outbreak?
    for the guys that have warts on their penis, do u experienc any discomfort within your penis, such as burning when urinating, red knob, inflamed knob, itchiness,or isit just warts that have no effect on the penis

    • ANSWER:
      Genital warts do not come and go like an outbreak of herpes. They begin as tiny bumps that grow, and grow, and grow, until they look like a little cauliflower, and sometimes they grow quite large. There may be several of them in a small area or just one. They itch and ooze and sometimes have an odor. A physician has to remove them either with cryotherapy or cauterize them surgically.

  35. QUESTION:
    I got a cauliflower ear on my right ear, does that make me unattractive?
    I have a cauli it used ot be HUGE so I drained it and now my ear looks 90% fine just a small bump inside and the inside of my ear has sort of like stretch marks.

    I started MMA and self defense training because I felt weak and because I'm skinny and because I wanted the people who tried to step on over me would respect me.

    Does a cauli give the "don't mess with me or else "message even though I'm really skinny?

    and will this slight deformity affect me with the girls?

    • ANSWER:
      Ask women.

  36. QUESTION:
    lump on the foreskin below the head of the penis?
    well, it was sunday i noticed i got some kinda pimple it looked . but i tried poppen it and it hurts. lol. im really curious about this. i havent done any sexual activities for the past year. i doubt it would be std , what cuhd it mite be ? if necessary, i can show a picture. ? . btw, it doesnt hurt not unless i tried popping it.

    • ANSWER:
      It can be anything from herpes [unlikely if it's a single bump]; a genital wart [somewhat likely if it's smaller than a grain of uncooked rice, pinkish or whitish-gray color, but later turns into a pendiculated, cauliflower-like growth]; or just a sebaceous cyst [the most likely since you are uncircumcised]. Send your real e-mail to me using the link provided in my profile; I'll reply with my e-mail, and you can send a picture so I can take a look at it. I'm a Registered Nurse, and I'll be more than happy to help you to the extent that my clinical expertise allows. Hope to hear from you real soon; my advise is free of charge, by the way. In the meantime, take a look at the following links of penile herpes and venereal warts:

      http://www.asksam2.com/images/stories/std/pearly_penile_papules.jpg
      http://web.udl.es/usuaris/dermatol/Atlasweb/herpes_simple_genital/600/herpes_simple_genital03.jpg
      http://health-pictures.com/warts/images/genitial-herpes.jpeg
      http://www.hpv-genital-warts-pictures.com/image-files/condylomaaccuminatum.jpg

  37. QUESTION:
    how do you get a cervical infection?
    What is a cervical infection and how do you know if you have it?

    • ANSWER:
      I hope the following information makes things clearer!

      HPV / Cervical infection Definition

      HPV infection is a condition contracted from one of a group of more than 100 related human papillomaviruses (HPVs).

      Each type of HPV has the potential to cause an abnormal growth on a particular part of your body — genital warts and other lesions on or near your genitals or anus, common warts on your hands, plantar warts on your feet, and warts and other lesions in your mouth and upper respiratory system.

      HPV infections are common. About 20 million people in the United States have HPV infections that can cause genital warts and related lesions. Some types of HPV infection can cause cancer, such as cervical cancer, but most HPV infections don't lead to cancer.

      Symptoms

      HPV infections often go undetected because they don't cause warts or other lesions. Even if you don't exhibit signs and symptoms of the infection, they may emerge later and you may transmit the virus to someone else.

      The signs and symptoms that do appear vary according to the type of HPV infection you may have:

      ■Genital warts. Genital warts are nonmalignant and appear as a flat lesion, a tiny cauliflower-like bump or a tiny stem-like protrusion. HPV infections of types 6 and 11 cause most genital warts. These HPV types are generally not associated with cancer.

      In women these warts appear most commonly on the vulva but may also occur near the anus, on the cervix or in the vagina. In men these may appear on the penis and scrotum or around the anus. Genital warts rarely cause discomfort or pain.

      ■Pre-malignant genital lesions. Certain HPV infections can cause cellular changes that result in precancerous lesions. These abnormalities are most often detected by a Pap test, a simple procedure to collect cells from the cervix or vagina for laboratory examination.

      Abnormalities that are determined to be "low grade" usually resolve — the cells return to normal — without treatment. HPV infections of types 6 and 11 are common causes of these low-grade abnormalities.

      High-grade abnormalities are less likely to resolve, and some will advance to cancer of the cervix, vagina or vulva. HPV infections of types 16 and 18 are the most common causes of high-grade abnormalities.

      ■Oral and upper respiratory lesions. Some HPV infections may cause warts and other lesions to form on your tongue, tonsils, soft palate, and larynx and in your nose. These lesions may be the result of low-risk HPV types, such as 6 and 11, or high-risk types, such as 16 and 18.
      ■Cervical cancer and other tumors. Most genital HPV infections of high-risk types don't develop into cancer; however, persistent infections — generally lasting more than two years — create a greater risk of cancer. Abnormal vaginal bleeding, such as excessively heavy menstrual bleeding or bleeding between periods, are common symptoms of cervical cancer.

      Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by HPV infections. An estimated 11,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with cervical cancer annually, and more than 3,800 die of the disease each year. Worldwide, cervical cancer is far more common because many women lack access to Pap test screening. HPV types 16 and 18 account for about 70 percent of all cases of cervical cancer.

      HPV infections of type 16 and 18, as well as other high-risk types, may also contribute to cancers of the genitals, anus, mouth and upper respiratory tract.

      ■Common warts. Common warts are nonmalignant skin growths that usually appear on your hands, fingers or around fingernails. These warts appear as rough, raised bumps. They're generally nuisances because of their appearance, but they may also be painful or susceptible to injury or bleeding.

      Most children and adolescents have been exposed to HPVs that cause these warts, but only a small percentage actually get warts. Most people don't get common warts after age 20.

      ■Plantar warts. Plantar warts are hard, grainy, nonmalignant growths that usually appear on the heel or ball of your feet, areas that feel the most pressure. These warts may cause discomfort or pain. Although plantar warts are common in adulthood, most adults first encountered them during childhood or adolescence.
      ■Flat warts. Flat warts are flat-topped, slightly raised, nonmalignant lesions darker than your regular skin color. They usually appear on your face, neck, hands, wrists, elbows or knees. HPV infections that cause flat warts usually affect children, adolescents and young adults.
      When to see a doctor
      If you or your child has warts of any kind that cause embarrassment, discomfort or pain, seek advice from your doctor.

      For women, it's important to have regular Pap tests. A Pap test is the best tool to detect an HPV infection that could lead to cervical cancer. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that a woman begin annual Pap tests about three years after first having

  38. QUESTION:
    How do you know if you got HPV?
    I just wanted to know how do you know if you got HPv and what are the sympthoms from it

    • ANSWER:
      These days it is hard to tell gender from a name.

      Carson - if you are a boy - HPV is the human papilloma virus. It is sexually transmitted and causes genital warts and it can lead to cervical cancer in women. If you are a boy, then warts will show up on your penis, scrotum, perineum, or anus. They can be small raised bumps or flat red marks or big bumps that are shaped a little like cauliflowers.

      If you are a girl - you can get warts on your labia, perineum or anus. They look the same on boys or girls. However, you may not have any external warts, because the virus infected you inside your vagina on your cervix. There is no way to know they are there unless you go to the doctor and get a pap test. The pap test is simple and well tolerated and is a pretty good method for detecting HPV. It is a screening test, and is therefore not definitive. This means that girls have to go for a pap test every year from the time they start having sex until they are old and grey.

      If HPV on the cervix goes undetected and untreated it can lead to cervical cancer.

      A pretty good test you can do at home to determine if the bumps you find are warts or if they are just ingrown hairs or chicken pox scars or whatever is to dab vinegar on them. If they are warts, most of the time, the infected area will turn white.

  39. QUESTION:
    Skin colored bump on Side of Penis shaft Painless and soft PLEASE HELP?
    Ive had this really soft flesh colored bump on the left side of my penis shaft that sits over a Vein for about 4 months. I have fordyce spots but this one is bigger and the center looks white and there's no fluid but theres Fordyce spots around it. It was Unnoticeable until about 2 days after i recieved Oral Sex from a woman about 3 months ago, before then it was small like a regular Fordyce spot. It Literally looks like just a slightly raised spot thats dry. No cauliflower shape like a Genital Wart. No blistering or bleeding or anything like that. It'll itch every now and then but just like a regular itch from hair. Im african American also if this helps. Its Causing me Mental Discomfort though can somebody PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!!

    • ANSWER:

  40. QUESTION:
    My dog has a bump on his face?
    I was playing tug-of-war with my chihuahua when I noticed a small bump in between his eyes ( the space between his eyes). I dont remember him getting hurt or anything. It is not bleeding or anything its just a bump. When I try to touch it, he cries. What could this be? Any ideas on how he couldve gotten this?

    • ANSWER:
      During the course of grooming, playing with, or handling your dog, you may discover a lump or bump or or beneath the skin. To learn what it may be, see this table on lumps or bumps or or beneath the skin.

      Abscess: A painful collection of pus at the site of a bite or puncture wound.

      Basal cell tumor: Solitary nodule, usually on a narrow base or stalk. Round, normally hairless, and may be ulcerated. Found on the head, neck, and shoulders of older dogs.

      Ceruminous gland adenoma: A pinkish-white dome-shaped growth in the ear canal less than 1 centimeter in size. May become ulcerated and infected.

      Epidermal inclusion cyst: A firm lump beneath the skin. May discharge cheesy material and become infected.

      Hematoma: A collection of clotted blood beneath the skin; often involves the ear flaps.

      Histiocytoma: Rapidly growing dome-shaped (buttonlike) growth found anywhere on the body, usually in young adults.

      Lipoma: Smooth round or oblong growth beneath the skin; feels somewhat soft.

      Mast cell tumor: Solitary or multiple growths usually found on the trunk, perineum, and legs. More prevalent in certain breeds, including Boxers, Golden Retrievers, Bulldogs, and Boston Terriers.

      Melanoma: A brown or black pigmented nodule found in areas of dark skin. Growths in mouth and nailbeds usually are malignant.

      Perianal gland tumor: A solitary or multinodular growth in the perineum around the anus. Occurs most often in older intact males.

      Sebaceous adenoma: Also called sebaceous cyst. Smooth, pink, wartlike growth less than 1 inch (2.5 cm) in diameter. Most common on the eyelids and limbs. Occurs in older individuals (average age 10). Very common in Poodles and Cocker Spaniels.

      Skin papillomas: These grow out from the skin and may look like a wart. Not painful or dangerous
      Soft-tissue sarcomas: Ill-defined or well-demarcated masses of varying size and location. Often slow growing.

      Squamous cell carcinoma: A nonhealing gray or reddish-looking ulcer found on the belly, scrotum, feet, legs, lips, or nose. May resemble a cauliflowerlike growth.

      Transmissible venereal tumors: Ulcerated, often multiple cauliflower-like growths on the genitalia of both sexes.

  41. QUESTION:
    I have white round bumps in clusters on the inside of my vagina...it concerns me very much. Can anyone help?
    Can anyone give me any suggestions to what it might be? They hurt when i urinate and burn when I touch them. I fear it might be genital warts or herpes.

    • ANSWER:
      Genital warts are the only visible sign of HPV infection, but they may not appear for weeks, months or even years after infection occurs, if they appear at all. Women are more likely than men to develop warts, and they can grow on the lips of the vulva, around the clitoris, inside the vagina, around the urethra, on the cervix, on the area between the vagina and the anus (perianal region), and in and around the anus itself. In men, warts tend to develop on the tip and shaft of the penis, on the scrotum, as well as in and around the anus. Although rare, genital warts may develop in a person's mouth or throat if infected through oral sex.

      Warts may appear as small red or white bumps, they may grow alone or in cauliflower-like clusters, or they may be flat and barely visible.

      Genital warts are generally not painful, but may be itchy or uncomfortable. You may not realise you have warts, particularly if they are small, inside the vagina or on your cervix.

      I found this on Womens Health. This sounds like what it could be. I would definitely make an appt with your gyno!

  42. QUESTION:
    Cluster of raised, skin colored bumps on knuckles?
    They are pretty small, and I've had them for a while now. There used to be a couple but now there are a whole lot more. They are not itchy but bleed when scratched. It's quite possible that they're just warts, but I'm not familiar with them so light shed would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Most likely warts, especially if they're spreading. Warts have a bumpy, almost cauliflower-like appearance, sometimes appear in clusters, don't generally hurt, and can spread all over your body just from touching them. Go to the doc and get 'em frozen off.

  43. QUESTION:
    How can you tell if you have a wart on your penis?

    • ANSWER:
      If you have any question in your mind about the possibility of what you are seeing or feeling on your penis is a wart then go see your doctor.

      WHAT ARE GENITAL WARTS?

      Genital warts (sometimes called condylomata acuminata or venereal warts) are the most easily recognized sign of genital HPV infection. Many people, however, have a genital HPV infection without genital warts.

      Genital warts are soft, moist, or flesh colored and appear in the genital area within weeks or months after infection. They sometimes appear in clusters that resemble cauliflower-like bumps, and are either raised or flat, small or large. Genital warts can show up in women on the vulva and cervix, and inside and surrounding the vagina and anus. In men, genital warts can appear on the scrotum or penis. There are cases where genital warts have been found on the thigh and groin.

      read more at the site listed below GOOD LUCK

  44. QUESTION:
    Can you catch warts from other people? How do people get warts?

    • ANSWER:
      Warts can be passed on from person to person, like a contagious virus. Warts are a virus, than is more common in kids,rather adults.Warts are skin infections caused by viruses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) family.They can affect any area of the body, but tend to invade warm, moist places, like small cuts or scratches on the fingers, hands, and feet. Warts are usually painless unless they're on the soles of the feet or another part of the body that gets bumped or touched all the time.
      There are actually different types of warts;

      common warts. Usually found on fingers, hands, knees, and elbows, a common wart is a small, hard bump that's dome-shaped and usually grayish-brown. It has a rough surface that may look like the head of a cauliflower, with black dots inside.

      flat warts. These are about the size of a pinhead, are smoother than other kinds of warts, and have flat tops. Flat warts may be pink, light brown, or yellow. Most kids who get flat warts have them on their faces, but they can also grow on arms, knees, or hands and can appear in clusters.

      plantar warts. Found on the bottom of the foot, plantar warts can be very uncomfortable — like walking on a small stone.

      filiform warts. These have a finger-like shape, are usually flesh-colored, and often grow on or around the mouth, eyes, or nose.
      .

      If you are looking for a cure to the wart:

      How it works:
      Loads of potassium in the banana peel.

      Recipe:
      Rub the inside of a little piece of a banana peel on a wart every night. You should see results within one to two weeks.

  45. QUESTION:
    What could small bumps be on your nose which don't hurt and are not acne and how can it be cured?

    • ANSWER:
      I know you said its not acne but here are the uncommonly known forums of acne:

      Papules — inflamed lesions that appear as small, pink bumps on the skin

      Pustules (pimples) — inflamed pus-filled lesions that are red at the base

      Cysts and nodules — large, inflamed, pus-filled lesions that are lodged deep and can drain, causing pain and scarring

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      An allergic reaction – may cause bumps

      Common warts - Usually found on fingers, hands, knees, and elbows, a common wart is a small, hard bump that's dome-shaped and usually grayish-brown. It has a rough surface that may look like the head of a cauliflower, with black dots inside.

      Flat warts, also called juvenile warts - These are about the size of a pinhead, are smoother than other kinds of warts, and have flat tops. Flat warts may be pink, light brown, or yellow. Most kids who get flat warts have them on their faces, but they can also grow on arms, knees, or hands and can appear in clusters.

      I hope this helps.

      Information obtained from: http://www.dimensions03.org/types-of-acne.html http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial_viral/wart.html

  46. QUESTION:
    STD's- is it a bacteria, virus, parasite. What are the symptoms and how to treat it?
    Detailed answer please

    • ANSWER:
      STDs can be all of the above. Bacteria are chlamydia (often no symptoms in women, cloudy/clear discharge in men and itching), gonorrhea (green/white discharge, burning when you pee), and syphilis (open sores on genitals, rash), and these are treated with antibiotics. Viruses are genital warts (cauliflower-like things on genitals), herpes (small painful red bumps on genitals), AIDS, and HIV (need blood tests) and they can be treated with creams for warts, anti-virals for herpes, HIV, and AIDS. Parasite is trichomoniasis (burning when you pee for men, green frothy discharge and fishy smell for women) and is treated with an antibiotic.

  47. QUESTION:
    Wierd scratchy bumps on my fingers?
    A few days ago I started to get wierd bumps on my fingers, they kind of look like small mosquito bites, but not as big and not red. Do you have a clue on what it could be?

    • ANSWER:
      Bad to say without seeing them. Could be calluses, have you been doing anything which might give you calluses, playing guitar or typing lots? Could be warts, (warts have a cauliflower like appearance) could be an insect bite (unusual place to get them), allergy or could be a burn or some type of other mechanical injury. Sorry to be vague, a bit difficult to say without seeing them.

  48. QUESTION:
    little red bumps around vaginal or anus?
    i just noticed this about 4 or 5 days ago...i am 16 sexually active, i have a boyfriend whom i've been with for six months now, and hes only slept with four people including me, i have little red bumps and i mean a lot around my anus and vaginal area, in the past couple days they've been spreading up my legs and more around my butt, what could this be? and is it serious? they don't hurt or itch though.

    • ANSWER:
      May be herpes simplex infection or genital warts.
      Herpes simplex infection-- symptoms:- Herpes simplex virus-1 usually shows up as cold sores or blisters. For those who have herpes simplex virus-2, some have no symptoms, while others may show signs of an infection from five to twenty days after having sex with an infected partner. Early symptoms can include a burning sensation in the genitals, low back pain, pain when urinating, and flu-like symptoms. A short while later, small red bumps may appear around the genitals or on the mouth; later these bumps become painful blisters which then crust over, form a scab, and heal.
      Genital warts-- symptoms:- Many types of HPV have no symptoms, though some cause visible genital warts that may be found in the vagina or urethra or on the cervix, vulva, penis, or anus. Rarely, they are found in the mouth or throat. Warts are often flesh-colored, soft to the touch, and may look like miniature cauliflower florets. They usually grow in more than one area and are often painless, although they may itch.

  49. QUESTION:
    once you have lumps or bumps at the genetal area does that automatically means you have STD?

    • ANSWER:
      Not necessarily, but there are some STDs that manifest in the form of lumps and/or bumps [either a single one or multiple ones]. Examples include:
      -Herpes: many small, fluid-filled bumps that dry out and disappear within a couple of weeks. Then, these outbreaks reappear every 3 to 4 months if left untreated. Antivirals can reduce the frequency, duration and severity of the outbreaks, but the virus is incurable.
      -Condyloma acuminata [genital warts]: either a single or multiple "bump(s)" that start out very small. If untreated, they turn into pendiculated, cauliflower-like growths on or around the genitalia, anus, groin, inside of thighs, lips, tongue or oral mucosa. It's caused by strains 6 & 11 of the HPV {Human Papilloma Virus}; there's treatment for the warts, but the virus has no cure.

      Anyway, you should get evaluated by a physician. There are malignancies {penile carcinoma} or benign conditions {sebaceous cysts or infected abcesses} that may also cause bumps/lumps in the genital area. These, too, require proper treatment; better be safe than sorry.

  50. QUESTION:
    I'm concerned I may have an STD, how can I be sure without going to the doctor?
    Last September I had unprotected sex with a prostitute in Mexico. The next day I had a small sore on my penis and a few days later began to experience pain while urinating. When I got home, concerned about an STD I went to the doctor. I was checked for, excuse my spelling, gohnorhia and I believe Clamidiya and both came up negative. A few days later I didn't have any problems urinating. Then, perhaps in February I developed another sore (just one) on my penis, but it went away quickly leaving some scaring. Now, about a week ago I developed some red bumps on my penis that looked like warts then became sores, but not blisters. They are healing at a moderate pace, and no fluid was discharged. I've been worried about Genital Herpes and am praying that is not what's going on. What do you think?

    • ANSWER:
      I roomed with a girl in college who got herpes. If you had herpes, I think you would experience more pain, because she was crying buckets and she could hardly walk. You might have HPV though.
      Raised "warty" appearing tumors on the genitals
      Raised, flesh colored lesions
      Genital lesions: Genital sores (female), Genital sores (male), Anal warts
      Cauliflower-like appearing growths around the anus or female genitalia
      Increased dampness or moisture in the area of the growths
      Itching of the penis, scrotum, anal area, or a vulvar itch
      Increased vaginal discharge
      Abnormal vaginal bleeding (not associated with a menstrual period) after sexual intercourse

      You need to go back to the doctor, and keep your nasty butt away from prostitutes!!


small cauliflower bumps